Posts

A Different Kind of Writing Workshop

When L. Ron Hubbard initiated the Writers of the Future contest, he knew that there would be awards and publications for the winners. As Algis Budry, the first contest administrator put it to me, “He wanted to make sure that this helped launch new writers.

Prize Writing—Three Things to Know

If you think about it deeply, everything that you write is really for a competition. You’re competing for publication with other writers, for promotional monies from the marketing departments of various publishers, for literary awards, and of course for your reading audience.

Writers of the Future 2nd Quarter Winners Announced for Volume 35

The judging results are in! And here are the 2nd Quarter 2018 Writers of the Future Contest winners.

Humanity vs. Monstrosity

Eneasz Brodski has a definite opinion about the importance of human values vs. soulless monstrosities. And so this is his tale of how his story “Flee, My Pretty One” published in L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume 34 came to be. Check out the video interview below and Eneasz’s article that follows. “Flee, My […]

Writers of the Future 1st Quarter Winners Announced for Volume 35

The judging results are in! And here are the 4th Quarter 2017 Writers of the Future Contest winners.

Writers of the Future 4th Quarter Winners Announced for Volume 34

The judging results are in! And here are the 4th Quarter 2017 Writers of the Future Contest winners.

Defining Yourself

In this post New York Times bestselling author and Writers of the Future coordinating judge, David Farland, talks about defining yourself as an author and how that can help.

Giving Up

Sometimes it seems that your life has a theme. In the past couple of weeks I’ve heard from several authors the words “I’m thinking about giving up.” I worry about that. No one ever won a race by giving up.

Character Traits

New York Times bestselling author Dave Farland gives tips on characterization in story writing including common problems to avoid.

A Guide to Critiquing a Story: Seven Vital Elements Every Story Must Have

Frequently authors ask if I have a “form” that I used to help me critique a story. Given the large number of things that I look at in a story, any form that I had would simply be too long to be workable. Yet it makes sense to try to codify the critiquing process.