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Walter Dinjos

Walter Dinjos, author of “The Woodcutters’ Deity”

Due to visa issues in Nigeria, Walter Dinjos was not able to join us in person for the workshop week. This became a topic of discussion often enough that I could tell the thirteen writers who were able to assemble here sincerely missed him. They were in contact online, and they knew Walter would be watching when he could. But it wasn’t the same. Last year when he heard he had won the contest, he sent in a video talking about winning and coming to the United States and attending the workshop.

Sitting in the room with the winners, I can report that at times it definitely felt like a piece was missing.

Given that, when Walter addressed the event via a video, it took your breath away. He spoke in a voice that sounded like it made music. He mirrored comments of the week when he said he hoped he and his classmates would be able to come together somewhere around the world.

His story, “The Woodcutters’ Deity,” was published in the 33rd Annual Writers of the Future anthology. It is an African fable and a remarkable story that follows a young man who faces the stresses of family, self, and gods. This is among my favorites because it is so different from the standard fare.

This is something else I like about the contest. Its International aspect means we’ll see art from different places. This volume includes stories from Finland, the UK, and Nigeria, as well as the US. On the illustrator side, the volume includes artists from Poland, the Philippines, Canada, and Kazakhstan as well as the United States. This is what happens when you have blind judging, right? Best work wins.

Regardless, reading Walter’s work makes me doubly sad he wasn’t able to join the group. I would have been excited to have met him.

I’ll keep my eye open, though. Given the quality of this story, I’m willing to bet we’ll see more of Walter Dinjos.

[Update: I see Walter has already placed a story at another professional market!]

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Stephen Lawson going on stage at the 33rd annual Writers of the Future Awards celebration

Stephen Lawson, author of “Moonlight One”

Stephen Lawson has a way of looking at the world. It’s a slanted thing. Analytical. Questioning. You feel like he’s watching and assessing everything. It makes him seem quiet at first. Sometimes you’re not sure what’s happening inside his mind, but then all of a sudden he comes out with this fully formed thought that changes how you think about something.

Illustration for "Moonlight One" by Jason Park

Illustration for “Moonlight One” by Jason Park

This all adds up when you realize Stephen’s got a business degree, is pursuing another, and is a veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom. You get a feeling for the depth in his bearing when you discover he’s still in the National Guard, stays active in his church, and has been deployed in service of his country multiple times. You get a flavor of his reliability when you find he’s a company commander in that same National Guard.

Bottom line: Stephen Lawson has a jar full of life.

The good news for us, though, is that Stephen reaches into that jar of life and pulls out characters and situations that leap out from the page. I am, of course, specifically talking about “Moonlight One,” his story that is now published in the 33rd annual volume of the Writers of the Future anthology.

It’s a gritty mystery at its heart, a story that harks back to the gumshoe detective but has been updated to fit in a world that has seen lunar colonization. In other words, it fits right into the entire idea of the anthology to begin with. It’s a highlight for me, a change of pace within an anthology that’s full of change of paces. The piece shows me he’s got a voice and he knows how to use it.

Apparently, a lot of folks agree with my assessment, as his writing has picked up a couple prizes along the way to finding success with the Writers of the Future.

My bet is on the idea that these won’t be the last prizes Stephen Lawson finds himself in line for.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Ville Meriläinen talking to fellow author Andrew Roberts Ville Meriläinen talking to author Andrew Roberts

Ville Meriläinen, author of “The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove”

Ville Meriläinen’s cold country is Joensuu, Finland. His story, published in the 33rd annual volume of the Writers of the Future anthology, is titled “The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove.” Oddly, the work is some kind of a mix between a fairy tale, and fable, and an episode of George R. R. Martin’s Game of Thrones.

I say “oddly,” because Ville is a young man, still a college student. He wears his hair long and listens to death metal as if it were one of the basic food groups. He has a very quiet and wry sense of humor, which he wields like a foil. For fun, he pounds on musical instruments. This kind of image does not really fit a guy who tells fairy tales and fables, though the Martinesque flavor of the harsh lands these characters are dealing with certainly grounds them.

The story is robust. Reading it makes me cold.

Upon meeting him, it became obvious to me that everyone in the group loved Ville. The first thing they loved was attempting to pronounce his name, which comes in two syllables, and which this mid-western US tongue stumbled over long enough to be embarrassing before I got it right once. “The US tongue doesn’t work right to do it all the time,” he explains with a smile that he’ll repeat several times over the week. I am not alone in my rubber tongue.

They rest of the contest winners also enjoyed the fact that over the week, his phrase “In my cold country…” became meme fodder. Someone threatened to take a photo and begin the meme-ification of it all. Ville again smiled and basked in the entirety of it all.

That said, Ville wasn’t here just to play around. Like the rest, he worked hard. Talking to him about the business of publishing made it obvious that he’s a focused guy. He soaked up everything he could soak up and asked for more.

After the award week, Ville discussed his travel process back to his home. It’s going to take at least two days. Maybe a third if he misses that last bus. He has “an emergency couch” scheduled in case that happens.

That’s the kind of dedication you find in people who have long-term careers in this field.

So, yeah, go read “The Fox, the Wolf, and the Dove.” Then mark Ville’s name. I think you’re going to see it a lot more often.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Author Andrew Peery

Andrew Peery, author of “Useless Magic”

Andrew Peery is one of the more impressive people you could meet. He lives in Durham, North Carolina where he works as a physician. He has a family—wife and two younger children who he clearly adores. As a doctor, he’s a person who cares. As a father and a husband, he’s a man who loves. He’s also a guy who keeps hours that can be insane, yet he’s been hard at work writing for over six years—a process that has recently yielded “Useless Magic,” the 4th quarter first place prize winner in the 33rd Annual Writers of the Future Anthology.

It’s a story that says a lot about life, magic, and the things that we can control vs. the things we can’t. It clearly comes from a place deep inside him.

I absolutely love it.

It’s not too surprising that a physician would be a bright guy. Andrew fits that bill. He’s fun to speak with, so if you see him at a convention or some other writers’ thing, I suggest you sidle up and chat. You never know what you’ll wind up covering.

When I got a chance to talk with Andrew over the week of the workshop, though, what struck me most was that he seems to be one of those people who are so busy getting things done that he doesn’t always realize exactly how good those things he’s getting done actually are. You know the kind of person I’m talking about, right? The kind you want to shake. Take them by the shoulders and say “Hey! Look at this! See what you’ve done? See how fantastic this is?” But you don’t really do that, or if you do you try to do it gently because besides being borderline rude, you worry that if you shake them too hard you’ll break the spell that’s fueling them. Then where will you be?

(See what I did there, Andrew?)

You would be without a fantastic writer, is where you would be! You would be without the remarkable stories that come from him. And, let’s face it, I’m selfish. I want those stories!

Anyway, what I’m trying to say is that Andrew Peery has things to say, and he’s a fantastic writer. This is a combination that’s hard not to get excited about.

So, yeah, it was a total blast to meet Andrew. I’m perfectly content to sit in his waiting room as he gets his next work ready because I know it’s going to be worth it.

Andrew Peery will be at the Barnes & Noble in Raleigh, NC, signing copies of Writers of the Future Volume 33 on April 29 from 2:00 – 4:00 PM. Stop by, strike up a conversation and get his autograph. For information about author book signings, visit the Writers & Illustrators of the Future facebook page.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Dustin Steinacker

Dustin Steinacker, author of “Envoy in the Ice”

Dustin Steinacker is soft-spoken and open. He’s calm and collected on the outside, but having a conversation with him makes you realize that his mind goes in directions that yours doesn’t, and that this is a very good thing.

His story in the 33rd Annual Writers of the Future anthology is titled “Envoy in Ice.” It won first prize in the first quarter of the contest this year, which means Dustin has been waiting almost all year to come out to the workshop and dealing all year with the fact that his prize winner put him into another contest of sorts. How ironic that his story covers what happens when an alien species announces itself, but then doesn’t provide its purpose to us humans for … well … you’ll just have to read it.

And when you do, you’re going to know a little about Dustin, too.

It’s a fantastic piece of work.

It is a little hard for me not to be jealous of Dustin. After all, here’s a very young man who hails from Utah and just seems to have this natural gift oozing out of his pours. I talk to him after one of his pre-24-hour story exercises and he’s got these story things all connected up already without even having to work at it. I mean, how fair is that? But then you talk to him and you find out he’s been preparing for life as a speculative fiction writer well before he ever envisioned being able to be one.

He’s a wide reader, and a guy who won awards in school.

All week, he asks questions. All week he listens. All week, he talks about getting better, absorbs what other people do and talks about what that means to him. When I take my blinders off, I see him working.

So, when I read “Envoy in Ice,” when I see the protagonist working his way through the series of problems he’s confronted with, it’s a remarkable experience.

Here’s to hoping I’ll get that same experience many more times in the future.

You’ll find Dustin this Saturday, April 15, at the Barnes & Noble in West Jordan, Utah. He’ll be there between 1:00 and 4:00 PM signing copies of Writers of the Future Volume 33. Stop by, say hello and get a copy of the book for yourself.

For information about author book signings, visit the Writers & Illustrators of the Future facebook page.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Molly Elizabeth Atkins with David VonAllmen

David VonAllmen, author of “The Magnificent Bhajan”

David VonAllmen is someone who seems to always be on an even keel. There’s this sense of stability riding under his veneer that comes out even stronger when he speaks. He looks at things with a sense of calm that suggests that, oh sure, maybe the tornado is coming through town and the banks are closing up shop, and yeah, maybe the president has called the National Guard here to quell the attack of the Cyborg Phalanx, but, you know … things are just going to work out.

It’s an interesting character trait. A trait with an insidious downside. Unless you really look at this kind of person, it’s easy to discount how hard they work.

An example?

David VonAllmen

David VonAllmen

Let’s look at the Writers of the Future. David is a published finalist. He submitted, he didn’t take home a quarter’s prize, and still, he’s in the game. Open disclosure here: I was a published finalist in the past…I’ve felt this phenomenon. Seeing that I’ve been in his shoes I’m interested in him. What’s his story?

When I meet David, it’s clear he’s just like I was, and just like pretty much every writer in this collection of winners—he’s been writing with an eye toward publication for a long time. He’s been working with groups, and (though I’m paraphrasing here) I think he’s been trying to figure out who he is when it comes to this art form. You get a little of that when you talk with him. He’s full of questions about the craft and even more questions about the business.

I like this about him. He’s firm on what he’s trying to do. He’s got a vision. He listens. He absorbs during the sessions. He’s self-aware—a fact that comes out in the fact that he’s among the first of the group to be able to vocalize when he’s getting overwhelmed. He knows how to take a step back and get enough distance to breathe.

His story, “The Magnificent Bhajan,” feels like him, too, which feels strange because it’s written around an East Indian culture, and David is firmly from the central US, living today in St. Louis with his wife and two kids. But David VonAllmen has traveled a lot. He can do other cultures. The story is an intriguing fantasy. It speaks about a person’s self-worth as he grows older. When I learn that David’s been a high-end competitor in individual sports like biking and martial arts, the lightbulb comes on. David, you see, understands putting himself on the line, which is what his character, the Magnificent Bhajan himself, is required to do.

It’s a great story. Much fun to read.

It’s always dangerous to project when a published finalist might come back, so I won’t do that. But I will say that I’ll be keeping an eye out for more of David’s stuff, and that I’m pretty sure I’ll be seeing some. Soon.

You can meet up with David this Saturday, April 15 at the Barnes & Noble West County Mall in St. Louis. He will be there from 2:00 PM until 5:00 PM with fellow writer, Molly Elizabeth Atkins, signing copies of Writers of the Future Volume 33.

For information about author book signings, visit the Writers & Illustrators of the Future facebook page.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

C.L. Kagmi

C.L. Kagmi, author of “The Drake Equation”

C.L. Kagmi is a woman in blue. Lipstick, that is.

“It’s part of the uniform anymore,” she told me when I asked about it. She wore the blue lipstick to an event, and it caused such a positive stir that her friends requested it at other events, and now if she shows up without it, her friends and fans are disappointed. “It’s kind of who I am,” she said.

I like it. Totally makes sense.

If you do happen take advantage of a C.L. Kagmi sighting to strike up a conversation, the next thing you’ll notice is that this is a woman who can speak on a number of subjects with an innate sense of intelligence, which then makes it all the more natural when you learn she’s studied neuroscience and done clinical research. Now she’s a freelance non-fiction writer, branching out into science fiction (which was among her first loves). Research seems to fit her well.

Her story “The Drake Equation,” which is now published in the 33rd Annual volume of the Writers of the Future anthology, is a noteworthy piece of art that comes from all those places. The introduction to the story suggests that it’s an exploration of the famous equation that projects the possibility of the existence of intelligent alien species—which is true. But her story is much more than that. It’s an exploration of consciousness and humanity, with a point of view on what the future can bring for us.

In other words, it’s kick-ass science fiction.

This represents the second publication for C.L. Kagmi. Her first is a piece in Compelling SF #2 titled “Twiceborn.” It spawned the core of what has become her first novel. If you get the feeling Kagmi has some wind beneath her wings now, I think you’ve pretty much got it right. A conversation with her is filled with plans and subtle smiles. This is a woman who knows where she’s going. (“I want to move away from non-fiction soon,” she says at one point. “I like making my living with my writing, but I like fiction above everything else.”)

So, read “The Drake Equation,” and then go find “Twiceborn.” You’ll be seeing the first works of a woman who’s going to make a lot of interesting things happen inside the field.

And keep your eye out for the woman in blue lipstick, too. My guess is you’ll find she’s got a lot to say.

It’s going to be fun watching her say it.

If you are in the Southern California area, you can meet C.L. Kagmi along with Jake Marley, Golden Pen and grand prizewinner at the 2017 Writers of the Future Contest Awards event. Both will be there signing copies of Writers of the Future Volume 33 at the Barnes & Noble in Orange, on Saturday, April 15 between 4:00 and 6:00 pm.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Mike Resnick (L) presenting Sean Hazlett with his Writers of the Future award

Sean Hazlett, author of “Adramelech”

If you want something done, as the old saw goes, give it to a busy person. This probably goes a long way toward describing Sean Hazlett. He’s ex-military, having spent time driving tanks in the army. He’s got a pair of degrees from Stanford, and another pair from Harvard. He now works in the world of corporate finance, and lives with his wife and their three kids. On top of that he finds time to write, a practice that yielded “Adramelech,” the story that has now been published in the 33rd annual volume of the Writers of the Future anthology.

Author, Sean Hazlett

Author, Sean Hazlett

His story’s bio says he was successful on his 17th submission to the contest.

As we talked early in the week, I asked how many rejections he’s had. I’ve always seen rejection count as a badge of courage. The number he quotes back is staggering. It also goes a very long way to defining who Sean Hazlett is.

He is persistent. He knows what he wants and he goes to get it.

There is no such thing as hard work—only steps that lead to achievement. Again, this is a trait I’ve always thought enabled my own success. Never give up. But Sean’s level of focus is so far off the chart that I can barely even make it out.

The story in this volume is just as intense as Sean is.

It’s a dark piece of psychological horror with a pulp sensibility that would probably be right at home with some of what the contest’s namesake wrote in his heyday. Sean’s story is totally enjoyable in a dark and graveyard creepy kind of way.

Bottom line from me: you can expect to see Sean Hazlett’s name in the near future. Not just because he’s decided he’s going to succeed (which for a guy like Sean is probably enough on its own), but because the guy’s paid his dues. Like everyone else here this week, he’s done his hard-work practice.

“Adramelech” proved beyond a doubt that he can really write.

Anyone who digs stuff on a darker edge would be well served to keep their eye out for his next story.

As an aside, you can meet him in person at the Barnes & Noble Stevens Creek Blvd store in San Jose. He will be there on April 15, along with fellow authors from Volume 33, Andrew L. Roberts and Doug Souza. They will be signing copies of their stories in Writers of the Future Volume 33 between 1:00 and 4:00 pm. For information about author book signings, visit the Writers & Illustrators of the Future facebook page.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Jake Marley on stage with Erika Christensen and Dave Farland

Jake Marley, author of “Acquisition”

To meet Jake Marley is to encounter joy in its purest form. First there is the smile that comes to his face, and then the fact that the first thing you’re likely to hear from him is something like “I’m so happy!”

So, yeah, Jake fills a room.

After a while, you discover that within the various genres of speculative fiction, he’s also one of the most well-read new writers you’ll find. This comes from a combination of his basic passion for the field and the fact that he’s got hours on the road as he drives through Southern California as his employment, hours that he fills with listening to audio books. Regardless of where it comes from, he’s the kind of guy who can drop names of writers and stories into conversation like they’re salt or oregano. The recipe is always enticing.

“It’s all a show,” he says. “The fact is that I’m terribly introverted, but I’m always pressing myself to be more out there.”

I suppose it’s not too surprising to find any writer is fundamentally introverted, but when I find that every person who meets Jake has the same response—that Jake is a remarkable person to be around, and that he makes people happy without saying a word—well, let’s just say that there is more to him than he seems to want to let on.

Bottom line: some of the other contest winners began calling him “Jake the Great.”

Given this, you might be surprised to find his fiction can carry an edgy, darker tone—as is the case with “Acquisition,” his Golden Pen award-winning story that is currently published in the 33rd Annual Writers of the Future anthology. The events of the story start with a jolt, but the story of the story slides into your mind like a silent shiv, then he incessantly turns the knife in ways that … well … that aren’t like the Jake you meet and hug.

He’s just an impressive guy doing impressive art.

I hope to be reading it for many years to come.

Jake will be signing books at the Barnes & Noble Orange, CA on April 15, from 4:00 – 6:00 PM. Stop by and meet him and get a copy of his story, “Acquisition” in the latest edition of Writers of the Future Volume 33. For information about author book signings, visit the Writers of the Future facebook page.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com

Doug Souza, author of "The Armor Embrace"

Doug Souza, author of “The Armor Embrace”

Doug Souza hails from Modesto, California. He is a teacher of young children, a father, and a person in the process of discovering that he’s become a gifted writer. His story “The Armor Embrace,” published in the 33rd Annual Writers of the Future anthology, puts all of these traits onto the page for everyone to see. It is a powerful piece, proof of the amazing things that can be done in the short form. There is a reason that “The Armor Embrace” was the first place prize winner in the 2nd quarter of the WotF contest.

Anders Ericsson did the oft-quoted study that said a person needs to put about 10,000 hours of focused practice into becoming a master at it. Assuming Ericsson is right, it’s not too surprising that many of the writers who come to the Writers of the Future workshop as winners carry histories five years and ten years of toiling away in obscurity before suddenly bursting on the scene. Doug is one of these guys—someone who was always creative (I have to chuckle when I see his anthology bio says he was making stop-action films and putting on skits as a kid), but who decided seven years ago that he was going to actually be a writer.

Seven years.

I met him, of course, at the week-long workshop. He’s an interesting guy to talk with. On first introduction, he’s quiet and unassuming. You’re not sure what he’s going to say. But then he speaks up and asks an insightful question, and then a conversation follows, and suddenly he’s got all these fantastic ideas flowing and everyone is having a great time chatting.

I haven’t seen him work, of course, but I get the feeling that he’s a great teacher. He’s a sponge all week long. When he listens, he sits forward with his chin sitting on his folded hands that are propped up on the table. When he speaks, he circles his topic to get it warmed up then dives in.

At one point Doug talks about how it’s hard to make time to write at certain times of the year. I get the feeling he’s more comfortable as a binge writer than a “steady as she goes” guy, but that he’s working on that. In the end, of course, that won’t matter. I say this because for me the coolest thing about meeting Doug is that I can see that something has happened to him now, but I’m not sure he can see it himself.

Doug Souza’s has done the work. He’s an artist now.

You’re going to love his story in this anthology.

I can’t wait to see what happens next.

And if happen to be in Modesto, California this weekend, you can meet Doug in person. He will be signing copies of Writers of the Future Volume 33 this Saturday, 8 April, from 1:00 – 3:00 PM at the Barnes & Noble Modesto, located at 3501 McHenry Ave, Ste E. For additional specifics on the signing, go to the Writers & Illustrators of the Future facebook page.

 


Ron Collins

Ron Collins

Guest blogger, Ron Collins.
Ron Collins was a Writers of the Future published finalist in 1998 and a prize winner in 1999. He has gone on to publish about 100 short stories in prominent magazines and anthologies. Each volume in his fantasy serial Saga of the God-Touched Mage, hit the top 10 on Amazon’s bestselling Dark Fantasy list in the US, UK, and Australia. His short story, “The White Game” was nominated for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2016 Derringer Award. The first four books of his current SF series, Stealing the Sun, are available now. Find out more about Ron at typosphere.com