Posts

Eneasz at library

Humanity vs. Monstrosity

Eneasz Brodski has a definite opinion about the importance of human values vs. soulless monstrosities. And so this is his tale of how his story “Flee, My Pretty One” published in L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume 34 came to be. Check out the video interview below and Eneasz’s article that follows.

“Flee, My Pretty One”

This was originally written quite a while ago, for an open anthology call on the theme of “Start A Revolution.” I’ve been rabidly anti-corporation for most of my life. They’re soulless, profit-maximizing monstrosities, who know nothing of human values. Optimizers unfettered by concern for us. Stross calls them invaders from Mars. Many people have pointed out that they resemble the problem of unfriendly AI in their lack of human values + ability to alter their environment to fit their utility functions (including, infamously and recently, Ted Chaing). I agree, and I would love (or rather, once would have loved) to see a revolution bringing these forces to heel.

I call them Dragons. For two reasons. The first is that dragons are already known for their rapacious love of treasure, and their willingness to do anything to horde it. They are powerful, and non-human, so they make a good metaphor.

The second is that I’m racist against dragons. If that’s a thing? I realized this back when I was playing Shadowrun. During the course of a campaign, I realized that no matter what he did, I would never trust Dunkelzahn. He could be a saint for centuries, doing only good works, and die sacrificing himself to save me personally, and I still would say “Good riddance. You can’t trust a f**king dragon. He was obviously motivated by some evil plot, he held hatred for us all in his heart, and it will come to light eventually.” I’d be horrified if my offspring dated a dragon. Etc. I don’t care what they do, I know they’re evil.

Artist Alana Fletcher with Eneasz and the artwork for his story

Artist Alana Fletcher with Eneasz and the artwork for his story

And like, if you’re going to be racist, I think it’s probably best to be racist against a fictional giant lizard species, so you aren’t hurting anyone. And as long as I’m at it, I can maybe use that racism in my stories, so anyone who’s similar to me can get that same visceral revulsion.

Anyway, yes, the story is about starting a revolution against corporations, except that corporations are actual non-human persons(?) in the story. This makes it more satisfying to attack them, since violence against a person is always more meaningful than violence against “the system.” And giving your villains a voice and agency is more exciting.

Except, of course, violence is bad. And the real world is messy and fuzzy, so trying to apply sufficient violence to the correct target is never as clean as Hollywood and/or activists make it seem. So it all keeps spiraling into ever more chaos until everything is shit around you. And thus was born “Flee, My Pretty One.”

Of note: This story had a lot of near-misses when it was seeking publication, with editors saying “This is good, but it’s not quite right for us.” Then Trump was elected. And the next place I submitted to said, “Wow, this is great, you’ve got your finger on the pulse of the society.” And I nodded and said, “Oh yes, yup, that’s exactly what I was doing.”

I’ve been pissed at the system my entire life, regardless of the political party in charge. Because it’s not about the political parties, for the most part. It’s about the entrenched powers that stay entrenched from one election to the next, regardless of whether the Reds or the Blues are nominally in charge that moment. I guess most people aren’t that upset with the system itself. So, on the one hand, it’s interesting to see so much of the population suddenly as riled up as I’ve always been. It helped get this story published, at least. But I’m dismayed that what they’re angry at is still the politicians. I figure this means that once the politician in charge is swapped out, society will return to how it was, and nothing will have changed.

>:(


Eneasz BrodskiEneasz Brodski lives in Denver, Colorado. He is active in the Bayesian Rationalist community, an eclectic collection of misfits who believe humans can do better. Through the powers of science and technology, he hopes all humans currently living can someday celebrate their 5,000th birthday.

Eneasz has a number of meaningful relationships, of many varieties. He was raised in an apocalyptic Christian sect, and while he has left that behind, that childhood colors much of his writing to this day. He’s been writing since he could hold a pencil, but has only begun professional efforts in the past few years. He just finished his first novel and hopes to see it in print soon.

When he’s not writing, podcasting, or blogging, he can often be found gothing it up at a local goth club. He’s willing to strike up a conversation with anyone in dark clothes and eyeliner.

Larry Elmore & Rob Prior onstage painting a dragon at the Writers of the Future Vol 33 awards ceremony

Can You Draw a Dragon? How Illustrators of the Future Inspires Students

I am teaching in a home school environment and have students who are artists at heart.  Each week I teach an art class that focuses on specific skills as well as ideas that inspire.  These classes validate the imaginative minds of my students in addition to simply being fun.

After this year’s Writers and Illustrators of the Future Event, I was inspired to teach a class on dragons.  I first showed my students (ages 4 to 14) portions of the live stream event starting with the opening sequence with the live action painting of a dragon on stage by two amazing artists, Rob Prior and Larry Elmore:

This was followed by Pat Henry’s fantastic “Dragons 101” speech.  The kids really loved this presentation and the wheels were turning!

I then showed them a YouTube tutorial (Art for Kids Hub with the very kid-friendly artist from Utah named Rob) on how to draw a dragon.

The students followed along and drew their own dragon.  Most of the students were certain they could never draw THAT, but all achieved successful results. Here are two samples of the finished products.

drawing of a dragon

drawing of a dragon

The students especially appreciated the fact that they could choose specific colors and personality traits for their dragons, even though they had to follow certain steps to learn the basics.

Art empowers anyone who will jump in and give it a try, and I thank the Writer’s and Illustrator’s Contest for not only featuring the creative efforts of some of our finest new artists on the scene, but also for inspiring the Future Artists of the Future, if I may coin a name for the group, to find their own personal genius through the arts.

 


Sisu Raiken

Sisu Raiken

Guest Blogger, Sisu Raiken received a BA in Music from Upsala College and studied at The Mannes School for Music, The National Shakespeare Conservatory and The National Improvisational Theatre in New York City. She has taught voice, acting and fine art and also has directed musicals and plays. She has held the position of Artistic Director at The New Village Leadership Academy, an independent school in Calabasas, California from 2005 to 2013. She is currently on the arts faculty for Every Kid’s A Genius.