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Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

Wonderful answers, StarReacher, and thank you for keeping up with the class and doing the exercises. Formulating the answers to post here actually embeds the lessons into our gray matter. We won't easily forget them. This is for your benefit I do this, and why I request this. Well done!

Again, the lightbulb appears. "tyle and voice are subjective for judges. Swift's precise, fluid style may be just what gives her the edge the next go around. Copying someone else's style dilutes your own strength."

I cannot stress that last sentence enough. There is a Super Secret coming titled, "Protect Your Voice!" I think you will like it.

To all: do your best to keep up with the exercises, including formulating them into posts for here. This thread will be moving quickly because we have much to cover. You knew this was going to be a master class, so prove you have the dedication to become a master. That said, I am hereby giving Dutson some slack--he's working six days a week at the post office, 60 hours or more right now. We understand.

Back to our lesson.

"You fear the man that has practiced one kick, one thousand times." And someone like Bruce Lee, that practiced one kick ten thousand times? That's just freaky. Like Stephen King freaky. Who did exactly that, in his own art form....

All the beast,

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 24, 2019 4:51 am
einstein36
(@einstein36)
Bronze Member
Posts: 69

Most definitely that each market one submits to is subjective to the editor. Why it's always best to research(Yes, I know it's time consuming, but in the long run, might be worth it for a potential sale).
But then again, just like music, even with the best research, you might get through the first readers slush pile and make it all the way to the editor's desk, but the subjectivity of the editor is what he decides to pick from the crop.
But definitely put yourself out there, don't limit yourself just to Writer's of the Future contest and hope to get published only once. I think at least if you put yourself out there and the editors, etc. start seeing your name, maybe the next fresh story you submit might be the one they pick for you to become published.
I currently before I submitted to Writer's of the Future contest, I wrote a horror story that I have been shopping around some semi-pro and non paying markets, and so far, I have 2 rejections, but I'm still on the lookout for new markets and writing fresh stories to submit.
Thanks to Wulf for that incredible list of markets, I definitely will be taking my rejected story from this last quarter, revising it and submitting them to those markets.
If this is a good time, Wulf, would like to ask my question about some of the market's requirements of no submission of your story elsewhere to other markets while they decide your story. I mean, your story is going to be held up for that one particular market for at least anywhere from 3 or so months, so you don't just want to send one story and sit on it, esp. if you are a professional writer. So how do you handle this requirement? Do you go ahead and send out one's story to multiple markets and if it does get accepted elsewhere, just email them to retract it from that particular market you submitted to that you are still waiting on??

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Posted : October 24, 2019 12:33 pm
RETreasure
(@rschibler)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 745

My guess on that one, Einstein, is to not put all your eggs in one basket, or in this case, rest all your hopes on one story. Write another, and send it to the next market. I have a rotating availability of stories, and while there are times when all my finished stories are out to market, there’s almost always an available market when a story comes back to me. When they say no simultaneous submissions, I respect that, but there’s a mutual respect issue. If a market holds your story far beyond what their reading window says it should be, withdraw it and send it elsewhere. The more stories you write, the less the waits will concern you. (Until you get moved to those “held for consideration” piles. THAT is a long wait.)

V34: R,HM,R
V35: HM,R,R,HM
V36: R,HM,HM,SHM
V37: HM,SF,SHM,SHM
V38: F, SHM, P, P
Available for critiques - PM for availability.
www.rebeccaetreasure.com

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Posted : October 24, 2019 12:44 pm
einstein36
(@einstein36)
Bronze Member
Posts: 69

Thank you....I will definitely do that..

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Posted : October 24, 2019 1:06 pm
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

Einstein asked a question about tying up your story at one market, when you could be sending it out to several at once simultaneously. Here's my answer.

Most markets, but not all, say no simultaneous submissions. There's a reason for this. They don't want to go through all the work of taking up the time of first readers, who then forward it to the editor, who then reads through the final stack of hopefuls, and chooses YOUR STORY, only to be told, "Erm, sorry editor. I sold it to someone else." Trust me, they will remember you for that, and not in a good way. What's more, editors talk. Publishing, especially spec fic publishing, is a VERY small world. Never ever tick off an editor.

But Einstein is right. It sucks to have a publisher hold on to your manuscript for six months or more, just to come back with a rejection. In six months, you could have shopped it to a dozen fast reply markets easy. So what's the answer? Here's mine. Save those markets for later, when your list of where to send this story has become thin. At that point, it's worth the wait. You don't have a lot of other choices.

This is why Swift and I posted how long each market takes to respond. It's something that should be carefully considered. If one magazine pays 8 cents a word but takes one week, and another pays 8 cents a word but takes four months to reply, if you don't want to tie up that story forever, you know what to do. However, if that long response time market is the perfect fit, the wait may be worth it. It's something you have to analyze with each market you send to. So now you know why response times play prominently on our market list. It's an important factor to consider.

One thing I do need to point out. Fast turnaround is not always a good thing. It usually means you didn't make it past the first readers. Or, if you get a quick personal rejection, it usually means an editor didn't read the whole story. You actually want editors to hold on to your story--it often means they are reading the entire thing because it's in their final stack of hopefuls. Note that even in WotF, finalists and winners are the last to know results because many decisions have to be made. Similarly, it takes more time for an editor to decide what they want to buy for their issue. My publication in DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019? I logged 318 days from submitting to signed contract. But I knew going in they can take that long to decide--every person on their large board of directors has to approve the stories they choose for each issue. That takes a long time, because you have to have first readers cull, send them up, and then wait for everyone on the board to read them, then get together in a conference call and discuss, and then send back out those stories you want but had bare-breasted mermaids and you want their ta-tas covered up, then wait for the story to come back and double check if the author covered those ta-tas with the right sized shells, and then there's contract revisions and so on and so forth. It can take some time before contracts are signed and the deal is done. That is what some of those long numbers actually mean. A deal was done.

Sometimes, a publisher is just known for taking a long time. In this case, I was aware, but I knew my story was perfect for them. I had a gut feeling it would be worth the wait. I was right. And Einstein, I know you got the story and enjoyed it. Thank you so much for your support. Those reviews on Amazon and on your Facebook page really help, and I am grateful for every one. It's one of the best things you can do to help your writer friends out. It not only spreads the word, but posting a review on Amazon activates its algorithms, increasing exposure when you hit key levels. Thank you so much!

I hope that helps. To all our challenge beasts I advise: Weigh each market. It's not just about who pays most, or who gets the most Nebula and Hugo recognitions. It's about the best market for the story you have written. Period. Do your research. Find that perfect fit. That is where your greatest chance for a sale lies. Not this mindless, "Start at the top and work your way down."

All the beast,

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 24, 2019 2:09 pm
rjklee
(@rjklee)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 175

On the off chance any of you have a literary short story you're ready to submit asap, I noticed that Electric Literature is open for submissions until midnight on this Sunday, October 27th. 1,500 and 10,000 words, $300/story, and 3-6 months response time.

R.J.K. Lee
WotF 2015-present: HMx6 SHMx1
My blog has monthly lists of upcoming deadlines and submission windows; let them motivate you to be more productive: https://figmentsdiehard.blogspot.com/
Give a listen to my creepy reading of my original flash fiction piece on the December 2020 episode of the Weird Christmas Podcast at the 22:10 mark: https://weirdchristmas.com/2020/12/23/weird-xmas-flash-fiction-2020-contest-results/. May Stosh persevere.

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Posted : October 24, 2019 9:07 pm
einstein36
(@einstein36)
Bronze Member
Posts: 69

Thank you, Wulf for your insightful knowledge...
We appreciate everything you are doing for us:)…

Einstein asked a question about tying up your story at one market, when you could be sending it out to several at once simultaneously. Here's my answer.

Most markets, but not all, say no simultaneous submissions. There's a reason for this. They don't want to go through all the work of taking up the time of first readers, who then forward it to the editor, who then reads through the final stack of hopefuls, and chooses YOUR STORY, only to be told, "Erm, sorry editor. I sold it to someone else." Trust me, they will remember you for that, and not in a good way. What's more, editors talk. Publishing, especially spec fic publishing, is a VERY small world. Never ever tick off an editor.

But Einstein is right. It sucks to have a publisher hold on to your manuscript for six months or more, just to come back with a rejection. In six months, you could have shopped it to a dozen fast reply markets easy. So what's the answer? Here's mine. Save those markets for later, when your list of where to send this story has become thin. At that point, it's worth the wait. You don't have a lot of other choices.

This is why Swift and I posted how long each market takes to respond. It's something that should be carefully considered. If one magazine pays 8 cents a word but takes one week, and another pays 8 cents a word but takes four months to reply, if you don't want to tie up that story forever, you know what to do. However, if that long response time market is the perfect fit, the wait may be worth it. It's something you have to analyze with each market you send to. So now you know why response times play prominently on our market list. It's an important factor to consider.

One thing I do need to point out. Fast turnaround is not always a good thing. It usually means you didn't make it past the first readers. Or, if you get a quick personal rejection, it usually means an editor didn't read the whole story. You actually want editors to hold on to your story--it often means they are reading the entire thing because it's in their final stack of hopefuls. Note that even in WotF, finalists and winners are the last to know results because many decisions have to be made. Similarly, it takes more time for an editor to decide what they want to buy for their issue. My publication in DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019? I logged 318 days from submitting to signed contract. But I knew going in they can take that long to decide--every person on their large board of directors has to approve the stories they choose for each issue. That takes a long time, because you have to have first readers cull, send them up, and then wait for everyone on the board to read them, then get together in a conference call and discuss, and then send back out those stories you want but had bare-breasted mermaids and you want their ta-tas covered up, then wait for the story to come back and double check if the author covered those ta-tas with the right sized shells, and then there's contract revisions and so on and so forth. It can take some time before contracts are signed and the deal is done. That is what some of those long numbers actually mean. A deal was done.

Sometimes, a publisher is just known for taking a long time. In this case, I was aware, but I knew my story was perfect for them. I had a gut feeling it would be worth the wait. I was right. And Einstein, I know you got the story and enjoyed it. Thank you so much for your support. Those reviews on Amazon and on your Facebook page really help, and I am grateful for every one. It's one of the best things you can do to help your writer friends out. It not only spreads the word, but posting a review on Amazon activates its algorithms, increasing exposure when you hit key levels. Thank you so much!

I hope that helps. To all our challenge beasts I advise: Weigh each market. It's not just about who pays most, or who gets the most Nebula and Hugo recognitions. It's about the best market for the story you have written. Period. Do your research. Find that perfect fit. That is where your greatest chance for a sale lies. Not this mindless, "Start at the top and work your way down."

All the beast,

Beastmaster Moon

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Posted : October 25, 2019 1:12 am
storysinger
(@storysinger)
Gold Member
Posts: 880

I haven't seen anyone post about the Beast Within prompt.
I've completed that exercise and reporting my progress.

I'm well into my 3000+ short story for the first quarter though I'll have to get beta readers advice on some of the content.

Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality-D.R.Sweeney
HM-V32/Q3
HM-V36/Q4
HM-V38/Q1

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Posted : October 25, 2019 3:11 am
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

I haven't seen anyone post about the Beast Within prompt.
I've completed that exercise and reporting my progress.

I'm well into my 3000+ short story for the first quarter though I'll have to get beta readers advice on some of the content.

To Einstein: you're welcome! Thank YOU for supporting me on "Weep No More for the Willow" published by DEEP MAGIC with your wonderful review! Thanks to others here as well, it's really appreciated.

To Storysinger: Sounds like you are right on track! You guys should have knocked out a 3000 word or more story by Nov. 15 at the latest. Get your second story done by around Dec 10 so you have time to choose your best, get a crit on it, clean it up, and send it to WotF by Dec 31st. The other you will send out to a respectable market before that date as well, and thus meet the terms of your sacred oath! : )

As for prompt stories, we're not posting more of those at this time. The Monday prompt is to inspire stories, but we would burden this burgeoning topic if we kept posting our Kill Your Darlings exercises. We need to keep it clear for commentary and Super Secrets and exercise responses. It's hard enough to keep up with all the pages as it is. Never fear! We will do the Kill Your Darlings Exercise again later in the contest year. For now, each of you got a small critique from me, and one from Rebecca (or else it's coming up). Think hard on what was said. Apply it to your longer tales, not just that piece. Those little stories are actually mirrors into how we write our bigger tales.

Finally, SwiftPotato, another assignment for you, since you are so helpful. Please, on the Introductions post that hyperlinks each of our members, underneath each put "Writing Sample" and link to each of the respective KYD submissions. It will have some functions I will tell you about as we go on.

Thanks, Swift!

So, has everyone caught up? All the exercises in? You will get out of this what you put in, as is true with all things in life.

I am ready to give you the biggest lesson of all. The SUPER SECRET that changed everything for me in selling my stories. Are you ready?

All the beast!

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 7:00 am
einstein36
(@einstein36)
Bronze Member
Posts: 69

Please, we are read...please, sprinkle some of that great magic super writing dust on us so we can be all great like you:)….

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Posted : October 25, 2019 7:17 am
SwiftPotato
(@swiftpotato)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 555

Finally, SwiftPotato, another assignment for you, since you are so helpful. Please, on the Introductions post that hyperlinks each of our members, underneath each put "Writing Sample" and link to each of the respective KYD submissions. It will have some functions I will tell you about as we go on.

Thanks, Swift!

Got it. I'll keep it saved off for posterity (and reposts) and try to have those all posted in the original comment tonight.
Speaking of which, someone suggested to me that it might be helpful to have some sort of sticky comment or post with all these informational comments (your challenge parameters, the super secret TOC, the market list, the roster, and probably the intro/writing sample comment as well) so they don't have to always be reposted. Do you know of any way to do that, o magical forum admin? If not, it may be useful to compile these things into some Google docs and share them with the challenge members so that they can see them updated in real time.

R, 3rd place Q4 v36!!!
Stories in Apocalyptic, Cossmass Infinities, and Podcastle

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Posted : October 25, 2019 7:32 am
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

Swift, please keep all the info "on campus" in our Super Secrets' topic. As for the intros and links to writing samples, they should remain at the start of the challenge, as should the challenge requirements. We all know the requirements, and we know to go back there to look up the introductions if necessary. If you'd like (I can't remember if you've already done this), you can link each name on the challenge roster (the members' log for meeting the challenge requirements) to their intro. Every quarter, that will be reposted, so one page has the power to cover several things at once.

So, at the start of each quarter, please repost the roster, because it will then be updated for fulfilling challenge requirements. At the start of each quarter, please repost the Super Secrets' link list. The link list IS our quick link to the original post to save some scrolling. As for the market list, each of use were supposed to make our own--that was just a courtesy sample guide.

Thank you.

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 8:43 am
storysinger
(@storysinger)
Gold Member
Posts: 880

So, at the start of each quarter, please repost the roster, because it will then be updated for fulfilling challenge requirements.

That answered my question.

As for the market list, each of use were supposed to make our own--that was just a courtesy sample guide

I hung a clipboard with a new lined yellow notepad on the wall within arms reach. Each page will be dedicated to one ezine.
After researching the prospective market I will send the best story for the guidelines for that ezine.

Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality-D.R.Sweeney
HM-V32/Q3
HM-V36/Q4
HM-V38/Q1

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Posted : October 25, 2019 10:45 am
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

[I hung a clipboard with a new lined yellow notepad on the wall within arms reach. Each page will be dedicated to one ezine.
After researching the prospective market I will send the best story for the guidelines for that ezine.

Great, Don! You are personalizing your market list. Now your baby krakens will have papa figuring out ahead of time which ships they might be able to take down. You are giving them a fighting chance! wotf009

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 12:16 pm
Retropianoplayer
(@retropianoplayer)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 231

Quarter 1 submitted to WOTF.
ADDITIONAL FRESH STORY sent out to magazine.

In perusing the voluminous number of magazine websites, I noticed something and its subtext kept flashing – WULF MOON, THIS ONE IS FOR YOU!

SO WHAT IS IT?

I forget the magazine (it was all such a blur), but one of the markets listed mentioned THE KEPLER AWARD. And get this – the short story has to deal with the MOON, and be scientific in nature. I immediately thought of SUPER DUPER MOON GIRL.

AGAIN, I can't remember the market, nor the time table or story length, but I think if anyone has a great shot at THE KEPLER AWARD, it would be Wulf Moon.

Best,

Retro

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Posted : October 25, 2019 1:09 pm
SwiftPotato
(@swiftpotato)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 555

Quarter 1 submitted to WOTF.
ADDITIONAL FRESH STORY sent out to magazine.

Wow, so early! Nicely done! I've got it written down on the roster for Q1.

R, 3rd place Q4 v36!!!
Stories in Apocalyptic, Cossmass Infinities, and Podcastle

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Posted : October 25, 2019 1:56 pm
rjklee
(@rjklee)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 175

Update and catching up...

Started all flash prompts including this week’s Beast Within, though I still need to work on paring them down to the deeper kernel within. Short stories for Q1 need to be started. As for my other assignments, I have posted some responses below: Prepare to Release the Krakens, Farland's Essay, Shunn Format, Infinite Game, and Denouement. The other three are likely forthcoming today, depending on how well I manage the pre-Halloween celebrations with my daughters.

Assignment: Prepare to Release the Kraken (Market Research)

That market list was a great help. Thank you SwiftPotato and Beastmaster for putting that together. I looked at every site and expanded on my smaller list and divided it between subgenres and formats accepted, including flash and poetry. There were certainly some I hadn't noticed before. Excited to try for more ASAP. There are a few more that accept 17,000-word stories than I had previously thought.

What do I write?
Genres: SF interested in pulp, adventure, time travel, family and corporate politics. Fantasy interested in spirits, non-human beings, thieves, and odd relations between city and MC. Dark Fantasy, Supernatural, Horror, Grimdark. Cyberpunk (but usually impure, mixed genre). Slipstream, Fabulist, Weird, Surreal. Literary Travel Fiction.

Formats: short stories, and flash, poetry, novellas, novels.

Where did I submit before? 13 times to Writers of the Future Contest. In 2016, short stories to Lightspeed, Nightmare, and Phantom Drift, a short story and poetry to The Audient Void, a novella to Tor.com, and 3 flash fiction stories to the Apex Flash Fiction Contest (250-word invasion and Xmas). In 2017, a different short story to Nightmare Magazine. That’s it.

Assignment: Farland's Essay Going Pro

6. Our first assignment is to read David Farland’s essay—he is the WotF contest coordinator after all.

I read through the Farland’s essay and I can see where some of our wisdom in this group is coming from, specifically the recent discussion of markets with the Krakens assignment. As Farland notes, “consciously choose who to submit to” and “don’t just take one shot.” These two points seem to be a major reason we need to put in the time to research and write up a list of where we will send our stories. I also like his mention of making lists of where he wants to excel, as well as take note of blind spots to worry over. I’ve heard him mention this before in his email posts, and good to be reminded. Lots more gems in there. Will read again.

Assignment: Shunn Format

I went through the Shunn format again, which I seem to review most quarters, and made two professional short story templates (one for WotF and the other for submissions with name and contact), prepped and ready to insert two stories into. It appears I did make a mistake on my last submission. While lines within the story itself were double spaced, for some reason all lines immediately surrounding the title were single spaced. Not sure why I did that. For shame. I also used the character “#” on a line by itself for line breaks of course, as the Shunn format suggests, but I goofed and aligned it left, rather than center. I think I had it correct in previous stories but messed it up here. And one other thing, I had written “###” after the last line of the story and aligned it to the left. I thought I’d read that was correct somewhere. But in the Shunn format it suggests centering the word “END” after the last line, so I went ahead and did so for my template.

New info for me was the italics. I think I read in Shunn that one should still continue using the underline for italics if you are using the Courier font, which I do, so I’ve been using underlines to mark italics all this time and had never realized that was wrong. I checked through the story I submitted for this latest quarter and had some underlines in there. Too bad. I know I’ve gotten Honorable Mentions with those doomed underlines in there. Maybe that’s all that was holding me back! Nah. Probably more than that, but hey.

Assignment: Simon Sinek Infinite Game

1. In publishing, who are you competing against? According to Sinek, if publishing is viewed as an infinite game, we’re competing against ourselves, which I essentially agree with, in that we must learn to adapt ourselves or our story to the needs of whatever audience we are writing for, though we may also be competing against our own reservations, blind spots, fears, weaknesses, etc. And by adapt, I don’t mean lose our voice, rather, I mean to learn how to best project our voice to reach those we would like to listen. And publishing is an infinite game, as those of us hooked on writing would like to continue producing more work and sharing it with the public.

The Writers of the Future contest could be viewed as a finite game in that there are set rules, we know the other players are driven and practiced writers around the world, we know who the judges are, and once you win, you’re done, finished. On the other hand, the overall mission of the contest is to motivate writers to reach a professional level and bring better stories to the world. That is an infinite game.

2. Does a rejection mean you lost, or does it mean something else? It means your story still needs more of your energy and effort to reach its audience. Perhaps you need to take the opportunity to revise it, and help it reach its full potential, or perhaps it means that it hadn’t quite landed at the best home and there is someone else out there waiting to receive the story in its present shape. I think I could say I lost, but as Sinek said, “for now”. “I’m behind for now,” but it is merely a chance to keep putting in the effort and growing as a storyteller.

3. How can each of us be leaders? Do we have to be top dog? What does it mean to lead?

I think of some of the writers who have really pushed to help others, and Delilah Dawson comes to mind. I’ve enjoyed her work, and I was further impressed when I stumbled onto all her tweets sharing vital wisdom for writing and life. She’s someone that’s succeeded at writing but knows that it doesn’t mean she should scoff at or ignore others. Quite the opposite. She’s in a spot to bring light to the world and she does so.

I think I got this same sense of togetherness when involved in writers’ groups before, and when I attended the Willamette Writers Conference. All these teachers, authors, agents, and new writer hopefuls brought together, and I found everyone was so talkative and supportive throughout. I found inspiration and guidance all around. Writers can be such amazing people. If I had stayed connected to that positive energy, perhaps I wouldn’t have stumbled into hesitation on my own. But that’s on me.

4. On midnight, October 20th, we become committed to one another's success in this group for a year (hopefully longer, but the terms are one year). In what ways can we assist our small tribe--that fellow on the right, that fellow on our left--to succeed in their journey toward becoming a published writer and to develop their professional career?

I think we can assist our fellow writers by listening to the challenges we face and lending our experience and insights. As we all speak up and engage each other, the whole pack will improve. Having a wealth of perspectives to draw on will help our creative work and our confidence grow stronger as well. I know I’ve had trouble getting involved, which can be an issue for me online and offline, as the responsibilities of life so easily overwhelm and make it hard to engage with others, but ultimately I feel much more alive and energized when I’m involved with motivated groups such as this one.
Seeing others push themselves to improve and send out what they’ve completed will motivate all of us to continue to do better ourselves. I suppose we could end up being a group of leaders supporting fellow leaders.
Hearing about someone sending in a piece to Clarkesworld (Henckel!), I was excited, thinking wow, they rock, they gave their story a chance to find a home and reach an audience. One rejection out of the way, and now it’s on to the next step forward. And we’ll all be doing the same. Solidarity!
It’s wonderful to have you, Wulf guiding us on this. Thank you so much for being such a positive force and providing so much content and drive. I hope our group inspires you in turn. And thanks to everyone else for being involved to. I’m looking forward to hearing more about your challenges, efforts, opportunities to grow, and hopefully, many successes to come.

Assignment: Denouement

1. What exactly is denouement, and why must a story have it?
It’s the wrap-up that tells the reader this story was worth it. It’s the last stretch you need to cross before those plates you started spinning at the story start come crashing down and ruin the delicious cake that was finally being delivered with the after-dinner Café Granit. Or perhaps the delicious cake being served would be the resolution, while the denouement would be the serving of those after dinner coffees or teas to give you the real satisfaction that will let you go home buzzing on a complete meal. It’s one of the hardest parts for me to get right. I’m not sure if it was said yet, but it is not the resolution of the main plot, it’s the tying up of the other remaining threads that were not solved by resolving the main plot.

2. Describe a denouement for us from one of your favorite books.
One series I love is the Gentleman Bastard Sequence by Scott Lynch, and I love how the denouements in these novels complicate the resolutions. In the third installment (possibly final if Lynch doesn’t follow up), The Republic of Thieves, the resolution reveals how the three thieves have successfully completed the task their master commanded of them, while also setting up an escape to protect themselves. The denouement gives us the real satisfaction of two star-crossed lovers having a moment’s rest, only to complicate it all with the last needling from their foe that leaves their company broken and fleeing. It tells the reader how the protagonists must still answer for past mistakes, and while this leaves us longing for the next installment, it satisfies a long-standing question with a frightening reveal. For me, my favorite denouements leave readers with at least an idea of how life resumes its complicated way after the resolution.

3. Go back to the last short story you wrote (not the Flash). Ask yourself: Did my story have a true denouement? And then confess. Here. You heard me. Don't worry, we'll absolve you if necessary.
Yes, I believe my last short story did. Following the resolution where my main plot threads revealed the faux success of the MC, the denouement revealed how the MC’s fears mentioned at the start came true, what happened to her friends (loss and betrayal and other true-to-life ironies), and finally gave the MC a real escape that answers what she hinted at in the beginning. It may have relied too much on the frame story, but I tend to gravitate to those.

R.J.K. Lee
WotF 2015-present: HMx6 SHMx1
My blog has monthly lists of upcoming deadlines and submission windows; let them motivate you to be more productive: https://figmentsdiehard.blogspot.com/
Give a listen to my creepy reading of my original flash fiction piece on the December 2020 episode of the Weird Christmas Podcast at the 22:10 mark: https://weirdchristmas.com/2020/12/23/weird-xmas-flash-fiction-2020-contest-results/. May Stosh persevere.

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Posted : October 25, 2019 2:00 pm
Retropianoplayer
(@retropianoplayer)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 231

Wulf, I just located where THE KEPLER AWARD is.

COSMIC ROOTS AND ELDRITCH SHORES.

More information in there. Submission in four quarters. If I read it correctly, they allow reprints.

Best,

Retro

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Posted : October 25, 2019 2:11 pm
Retropianoplayer
(@retropianoplayer)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 231

Thank you, Swift Potato.

Reading the web browsers on those magazines, and I come to something I think is up Wulf's alley (of course with the caveat he's interested in it).

Reading about THE KEPLER AWARD, they have four submission periods, and the story has to be about - wait for it - the moon. And scientific technology.

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Posted : October 25, 2019 2:15 pm
Peter_Glen
(@peter_glen)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 143

Leah, thanks for the list!... I've been going through it, and one thing that has struck me is the max word count of 3000 on some of the markets. I'd never considered that length, but it might be a good target to start playing with.

Wulf, I'm also grateful for your sharing and loved the Kraken in the box analogy. I've been thinking of my stories like my children and that, while my wife and I might believe they're beautiful, they are likely ugly to everyone else. But, yeah, if I don't let them out of their boxes, how else can they become monsters 😉 Seriously though, you and the whole pack are opening my eyes about this many-faceted business.

I'm about to start a new write for my Q1 sub. The other one that I've written is not suitable for WotF, and while a couple of months ago, I would have submitted it, now, I know it would just miss the mark.

The Simply Irresistible prompt has been done, but am finding the 'kill your darlings' element of the exercise challenging. Copied the 1000 word file with 500 tagged to the title and it ended up 1100 words by the time I was through 🙁 So I need to work out what I did differently with the 'General Firth' write and reproduce that.

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Posted : October 25, 2019 2:25 pm
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

Wulf, I just located where THE KEPLER AWARD is.

COSMIC ROOTS AND ELDRITCH SHORES.

More information in there. Submission in four quarters. If I read it correctly, they allow reprints.

Best,

Retro

Thanks for your faith, Retro! They do allow reprints. They do charge a reading fee of $20. And they'd like to see something of Kepler's work cleverly placed in the story as a bonus. That's the part "Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" would fail in--if someone wrote a story equally as good AND snuck in something of Kepler's work, they win, I lose twenty bucks. But maybe not, they do offer the potential for runner up monetary prizes. The plus is that the story is set on the moon, and meets some of the other tech items they seek for a winning story.

The question with fee based contests always is: it the return worth the price to play the game?

I do like fee based that offer you a subscription in return--at least you get something for your money if you lose. I did list one or two of those in the Sample Market List.

Thanks again for your belief in my story! If any of you believe in it and have WorldCon memberships for next year, you know you have the power to make Hugo nominations, right? Just sayin'. Smile

All the beast!

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 2:39 pm
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

Wulf, I'm also grateful for your sharing and loved the Kraken in the box analogy. I've been thinking of my stories like my children and that, while my wife and I might believe they're beautiful, they are likely ugly to everyone else. But, yeah, if I don't let them out of their boxes, how else can they become monsters 😉 Seriously though, you and the whole pack are opening my eyes about this many-faceted business.

The Simply Irresistible prompt has been done, but am finding the 'kill your darlings' element of the exercise challenging. Copied the 1000 word file with 500 tagged to the title and it ended up 1100 words by the time I was through 🙁 So I need to work out what I did differently with the 'General Firth' write and reproduce that.

Peter: Just like in this contest, you can't win if you don't play. So we'll work on helping you get those kraken out of their crates and into the ocean with directions to a ship they can shake to its timbers! Learning what markets seek is critical to success, which is why I said to study that list. Glad you are.

As to KYD exercise, yeah, your cut from 1000 to 500 should not go to 1100 when you're done. I'm not a student of high math, but something in that equation doesn't look right to me. : )

Again, your first job is cutting, and finding one word that says two or three. A simple rearranging of a sentence can often cut a few words. You can cut words rearranging a sentence. See what I did? How many did I cut?

When you go from 500 to 250, however, you have to put on a different hat. You are now the director, going in for the touching closeup. What's my motivation? Why did I write this story? What scene can I choke some emotion out of? What snowflake could I magnify, showing all those delicate lacy crystals? That is the power of the vignette. That is what you seek.

I hope that helps. You don't have to do them each week. But the more you do them, done right, the more you will train your mind to create with tighter sequences. There's going to be less flab, less slop. You'll find less and less to address when you're done. You might even get to that wondrous point where everything comes out of you right the first time.

Because you practiced one kick, one thousand times.

All the beast,

Wulf Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 2:55 pm
rjklee
(@rjklee)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 175

Leah, thanks for the list!... I've been going through it, and one thing that has struck me is the max word count of 3000 on some of the markets. I'd never considered that length, but it might be a good target to start playing with.

Hey Peter, I noticed the same thing, and I ended up organizing my market list so it was easier to see where I should submit my stories of say 10,000-20,000 words, versus shorter stories of say 1,000-6,000. I tend to write longer than 6,000 words, but I agree that it's a good target. One writing teacher I had always emphasized how setting particular limitations, treating your writing as writing strict poetry or as playing a game with set rules can help to produce better work. Of course that depends on the writer, I suppose, but I like the idea.

Wulf, I'm also grateful for your sharing and loved the Kraken in the box analogy. I've been thinking of my stories like my children and that, while my wife and I might believe they're beautiful, they are likely ugly to everyone else. But, yeah, if I don't let them out of their boxes, how else can they become monsters 😉 Seriously though, you and the whole pack are opening my eyes about this many-faceted business.

If you want a fellow writer to take a look at your Kraken, I'd be up for it. It sounds like I may be joining Deep Magic as a slush pile first reader, so you'd get a step up in that sense. Heh. I also need to get some readers telling me what isn't working.

I'm about to start a new write for my Q1 sub. The other one that I've written is not suitable for WotF, and while a couple of months ago, I would have submitted it, now, I know it would just miss the mark.

The Simply Irresistible prompt has been done, but am finding the 'kill your darlings' element of the exercise challenging. Copied the 1000 word file with 500 tagged to the title and it ended up 1100 words by the time I was through 🙁 So I need to work out what I did differently with the 'General Firth' write and reproduce that.

I'm in the same boat. Starting a fresh Q1 story this weekend. And my flash is going over. I just need to put more effort in and keep in mind Wulf's advice on finding that snowflake to turn into a vignette. On the other hand, one of them I'm thinking will go straight into short story format, while the other two will remain in the Kill Your Darlings process. Best of luck with your new story!

R.J.K. Lee
WotF 2015-present: HMx6 SHMx1
My blog has monthly lists of upcoming deadlines and submission windows; let them motivate you to be more productive: https://figmentsdiehard.blogspot.com/
Give a listen to my creepy reading of my original flash fiction piece on the December 2020 episode of the Weird Christmas Podcast at the 22:10 mark: https://weirdchristmas.com/2020/12/23/weird-xmas-flash-fiction-2020-contest-results/. May Stosh persevere.

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Posted : October 25, 2019 4:45 pm
rjklee
(@rjklee)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 175

Henckel - keep plugging away! You'll find a home for it! Clarkesworld rarely takes fantasy (as your title suggests). I also got a form rejection this morning, after a week there (am happy to be in good company! All we can do is move on and appreciate their consideration.)

I wanted to say right on to both of you for submitting to Clarkesworld. Another rejection means one less out of the way before the story makes it somewhere. Rooting for you.

We all have weaknesses, and we might overlook them; that's why it's important to have beta readers. I knew some of my weaknesses, and I learned of more from my readers' comments. Then for my next story - fewer constructive comments, since I kept my weaknesses in mind as I wrote and especially while editing. Is my story perfect? No. Is there more I could do that would change an editor's mind? I don't think so, and that's why I considered it ready.

I would say as important as working on our weaknesses is highlighting our strengths. If you have a few aspects of your story that really stand out - and none holding you back - then it will sell.

Don't just focus on weaknesses. Emphasize your strengths. Be the best at something unique so you can't be directly compared to others. That's one way to succeed.

Excellent point. I've noticed that even big name authors, those who really shouldn't have any typos in their big books but often do, still have weak points, and yet, their strengths are so solid that their stories are speaking to millions.
When I had a few beta readers it definitely helped me pinpoint weaknesses and resulted in a better story, and fresh insights. After seeing how my perspective could easily overlook certain points, I think it helped me manage more on my own, which is good, since I don't have any readers at the moment.
I like the idea of making the strong aspects of your story stand out as a selling point. While it's important to fit a story into whatever niche has already been carved out for it so it can resonate and speak to other works, a story's uniqueness can also be of importance. With markets like say the Drabblecast, where they appear to be requesting unique work, such a story could easily find a home. With WotF, that strategy might be less effective though, given that from a reading of Farland's essay Going Pro, it's clear he really made it a point of listing out multiple weaknesses and training himself to ensure all points of his stories were worked to perfection.
Another point to add, honing your strengths to perfection would also give you the confidence to work out weaker points, knowing for sure you already have pretty solid ground to train from.

R.J.K. Lee
WotF 2015-present: HMx6 SHMx1
My blog has monthly lists of upcoming deadlines and submission windows; let them motivate you to be more productive: https://figmentsdiehard.blogspot.com/
Give a listen to my creepy reading of my original flash fiction piece on the December 2020 episode of the Weird Christmas Podcast at the 22:10 mark: https://weirdchristmas.com/2020/12/23/weird-xmas-flash-fiction-2020-contest-results/. May Stosh persevere.

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Posted : October 25, 2019 4:58 pm
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

RJK Lee: How cool if you get the first reader gig for DEEP MAGIC. Greg will probably show you the ropes--I know he has trained in other first readers. He is VERY good. I have deep respect for him, he has a very good eye on what makes good fiction. It's a great place for you to learn the ropes. If you haven't read slush before, well, you're going to feel very good about your level of writing indeed. : )

Give my best to Kristin. She's wonderful. We've had many marketing discussions. I'm happy to see her first novel doing so well. And with Charlie giving her guidance, how could it not?

Keep finding that perfect snowflake in your story, That is where the haiku lies.

All the beast,

Wulf Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 7:01 pm
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

Rebecca Schibbler wrote: "This list goes far beyond what my results on the grinder have turned up. Especially the semi-pro pubs, which is a great market resource I've been hesitant to tap into. There are tons I've never submitted to! I've got a story fresh off a rejection - I'll be sending it out today to one of these markets. I'm tempted to go for my list (I've always gone for SFWA pay qualifying markets, based on the old rate, and going for the shiniest market first) but I'm going to trust Wulf and this assignment, and dig deep instead of just shooting my story off to Clarkesworld."

I'm glad you're thinking outside the box, Becky. I used to submit to markets the same way. But that's why we made the list, to start the wheels turning in alternative thinking. And your comment made me realize that even though I wanted to start with David Farland's essay first, I really do need to explain what I'm up to here. There's a concept I need to share with you. If we're going to buck traditional knowledge, it's good to know why. So here's our next assignment, and I'll post a Super Secret with questions soon on it (I've got some editing jobs I need to finish over the weekend). This Secret changed everything for me on the marketing side. May it do the same for all of you.

ASSIGNMENT:

In our course book HOW I GOT PUBLISHED AND WHAT I LEARNED ALONG THE WAY by Camden Park Press, please read Wulf Moon's article, "Never Let Go." Pay close attention to his analogy on Broadway and Off-Broadway productions. There will be a test. : )

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 25, 2019 7:24 pm
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2277

SUPER SECRET #37 is coming along nicely! People are going to break out their pitchforks and torches for sure on this one. But I'm not running. I know I'm right, and I'm going to stand my ground...for YOU.

Stay tuned! Try to keep up with your fellow challenge beasties! (And of course you get slack if you're working 60 plus hour weeks like Dutson, or are about to have a baby like Crystal CCrawford.) But if you aren't in labor or going postal (sorry, Dutson!) you have your ASSIGNMENT. : )

All the beast!

Beastmaster Moon

JOIN THE WULF PACK! http://the super secrets.com
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" wins WRITERS OF THE FUTURE VOL. 35 & BEST SF&F STORY OF 2019. Order WotF Volume 35 HERE!
“Muzik Man" in Deep Magic Fall 2020 wins BEST SF&F STORY of 2020
NEW! Don't miss the Super Secret "Character Agency: I Need a Hero!" in DreamForge Anvil Magazine!
JUST RELEASED! BEST OF DEEP MAGIC ANTHOLOGY TWO! Three Super Secrets Workshop members made it into this best of the best anthology! KD Julicher, Brittany Rainsdon, and some guy named Wulf Moon. Click HERE to get yours!
NEXT MASTER CLASSES AT FYRECON ONLINE, NOV. 18-21ST. Click HERE before they are sold out once again!

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Topic starter Posted : October 26, 2019 10:01 am
RETreasure
(@rschibler)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 745

I read all the articles in the book, and most of the other books in the pack. I still have a few to get through. I enjoyed "Researching History for Fantasy Writers", because it tickled my nerdiness and I learned a great deal.

I found the essays in "How I Got Published..." to be very encouraging - because none had the same path to success. We chart our own courses. More, I wonder if the destination isn't different for every writer, too. We all have our own definitions of success.

V34: R,HM,R
V35: HM,R,R,HM
V36: R,HM,HM,SHM
V37: HM,SF,SHM,SHM
V38: F, SHM, P, P
Available for critiques - PM for availability.
www.rebeccaetreasure.com

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Posted : October 26, 2019 10:47 am
SwiftPotato
(@swiftpotato)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 555

I've also read all the articles in the textbook! Now that I've read Moon's story in DEEP MAGIC, I can't help but chuckle a little when I think of his essay. No wonder he chose a metaphor related to seafaring when he's been entrenched in Capricho's world, presumably also for his novel...
Jokes aside, I agree with RSchibler. I always worry when I read books or listen to lectures on how to get published, because each method sounds completely different than the path I seem to be on. Seeing all these different paths put together into one book, though, made me realize that it's okay to not have the same path as a published author, because probably no one has the exact same path. The essential message of each essay boiled down to perseverance, or, if you will, being the barnacle. Smile
As a side note: I apologize for the delay in getting the links to everyone's writing samples pulled together, but they are up on the intro links comment now, at the bottom of page 46 (ascending order), if anyone needs to go back to them.

R, 3rd place Q4 v36!!!
Stories in Apocalyptic, Cossmass Infinities, and Podcastle

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Posted : October 26, 2019 11:19 am
SwiftPotato
(@swiftpotato)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 555

Additions to the market list below! Market list will be posted at the beginning of each quarter for your springboarding reference.

The Kepler Award, as mentioned above, is run by Cosmic Roots and Eldritch Shores (one of the markets already on our list). The next submission window is Dec 21-28 and the subject is the moon. Prize money for 1st place is at least $300, and the existence of 2nd and 3rd place winners is optional (as well as honorable mentions), all of which are paid. Their reward system is a little more involved, so please find more info here.

The Masters Review has options for both paid entry to contests and free submissions. Detailed information about each submission window is available here.
The New Voices portion accepts submissions from authors who have never published a novel (short stories in an anthology are fine) and pays 10 cents per word up to $200. Keep in mind that this means you will only get 5 cents or more per word if you sell a story to them that is 4,000 words or less.
The Fall Fiction Contest has a $20 submission fee and is for new authors only - details for what this means on the submission info page. Winners receive $2,000 and publication. 2nd and 3rd place receive $300 and $200 in addition to publication.
Other contests are not currently open but more info on them is also available on the submission calendar page.

R, 3rd place Q4 v36!!!
Stories in Apocalyptic, Cossmass Infinities, and Podcastle

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Posted : October 26, 2019 12:09 pm
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