Notifications
Clear all

Discussion: Q3 Volume 39

Page 1 / 6
 
Dustin Adams
(@axeminister)
Gold Star Member
Posts: 1064

Q1: October 1, 2021 - December 31, 2021
Q2: January 1, 2022 - March 31, 2022
Q3: April 1, 2022 - June 30, 2022
Q4: July 1, 2022 - September 30, 2022

Results and link to the winners will post when judging is complete.

2x Finalist
2x Semi
7x Silver
10x HM
Finalist #2 Read it here!

Quote
Topic starter Posted : March 1, 2022 10:08 am
Dustin Adams
(@axeminister)
Gold Star Member
Posts: 1064

For those who are awesome enough to be secure with Q2, whatcha got cooking for Q3?

2x Finalist
2x Semi
7x Silver
10x HM
Finalist #2 Read it here!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : March 1, 2022 10:09 am
RETreasure
(@rschibler)
Gold Member
Posts: 872

This startles me every.time. You think I’d expect it by now. I’m in for Q2, and l know what I’m subbing for Q3. Looks likely I’ll have 3 pending at once!

V34: R,HM,R
V35: HM,R,R,HM
V36: R,HM,HM,SHM
V37: HM,SF,SHM,SHM
V38: (P)F, SHM, F, F
V39: SHM, P, P
Always Available for 5-page Critiques
www.rebeccaetreasure.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 1, 2022 11:14 am
pdblake
(@pdblake)
Silver Member
Posts: 252
Posted by: @axeminister

For those who are awesome enough to be secure with Q2, whatcha got cooking for Q3?

Got two first drafts ready to edit. Been too busy staring stunned at the news lately if I'm honest. 

R:6 HM:5 SHM:2
My Blog

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 1, 2022 11:52 am
Dustin Adams
(@axeminister)
Gold Star Member
Posts: 1064
Posted by: @rschibler

This startles me every.time. You think I’d expect it by now. I’m in for Q2, and l know what I’m subbing for Q3. Looks likely I’ll have 3 pending at once!

Imagine my surprise when I almost missed it! I mean, 1pm? Dang. Usually I'm up and hacking away at the dates at 5am. ☕ 

 

2x Finalist
2x Semi
7x Silver
10x HM
Finalist #2 Read it here!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : March 1, 2022 1:45 pm
Rey Nichols
(@rnichols)
Bronze Member
Posts: 62
Posted by: @axeminister

For those who are awesome enough to be secure with Q2, whatcha got cooking for Q3?

@axeminister for me, it's a debate between a revision and resubmit, or finishing this half-drafted thing sitting in my story tank.

 

SHM: 1
HM: 6
R: 1
www.reynichols.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 1, 2022 6:09 pm
Cherrie
(@clfors)
Bronze Star Member
Posts: 108

I’m not sure yet, I’m 1/3 done with quarter 2. I have a couple other stories I want to write but have them planned for other venues. I also have a previous submission I might polish and resubmit. It’s one I submitted to a professional market and got a personalized rejection with feedback on.

3x Finalist Illustrators
2x Semi finalist Illustrators
1x HM Illustrators
5x HM Writers
https://clforsauthor.com
Author of the Primogenitor series: Progeny, Adaptation, Reunion

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 5, 2022 1:42 am
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592

I'm actually in the process of getting everything square for my upcoming quarters. Q2 will be a new story, then I have one brand-new and one new-to-the-contest story (one I originally wrote for the Contest, but left out in favor of a different story) lined up for Q3 and Q4, and then I'm intending to look at a revisited HM or SHM for Q1 of volume 40.

(I reserve the right to shuffle the order of those four around, though, in case I have any genius ideas about a Submission Strategy.)

The rationale for this is that I'm trying to have everything lined up in plenty of time, so that I can give my energy fully to novel writing for the remainder of the year. In large part, that's because I don't know how much time and energy I'm going to need to deliver on what I'm trying to write. It's been some time since I last took a swing at writing a novel--I have previously finished and then abandoned two novel drafts, and gotten two thirds to three quarters complete on another two--but I feel like it's really something I can engage with now. I've been brainstorming and world-building for it for the last month or two, I feel ready, and I'm excited by how the project has come together so far.

But I'm also determined not to be leaving myself out of the Contest running while I do it! So I have all my primary drafts, excluding any crit revisions that may come, complete as of about half an hour ago.

It's been a push, but a very deliberate one, and I'm feeling really satisfied with how it's been coming together.

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 5, 2022 12:56 pm
John Goodwin, Ease, Cherrie and 1 people liked
pdblake
(@pdblake)
Silver Member
Posts: 252

I'm sitting on a couple of first drafts and will be editing a novel that I realised I'd been letting stew for two, yes two years. Think it's time I edited it giggle  

R:6 HM:5 SHM:2
My Blog

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 7, 2022 10:49 am
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592
Posted by: @pdblake
I'm sitting on a couple of first drafts and will be editing a novel that I realised I'd been letting stew for two, yes two years. Think it's time I edited it giggle  

I'm envious of you having a draft worth the effort! I'm pretty sure my previous novel first drafts have more value in terms of the experience of having written them than they do in terms of the actual drafts themselves. That being said, while the stories aren't great (and, for one of them, has wildly inconsistent tone throughout), they do have some pretty fun ideas in them that I'll be plundering to use in better stories.

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 7, 2022 10:37 pm
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592

So, tonight's writing was spent finalizing my Q2 entry, and brushing up my intended Q3 entry, a revision that I cut around 1200 words from in edits. I'm happy with both of them, so with my Q2 submitted, I'm just waiting for the Q3 window to open so I can throw it into the mix too...

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 15, 2022 10:28 pm
pdblake
(@pdblake)
Silver Member
Posts: 252

Just starting to polish these two 1st drafts. One is definitely for q3.  

R:6 HM:5 SHM:2
My Blog

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 16, 2022 12:44 am
angelslayah
(@angelslayah)
Bronze Member
Posts: 81
Posted by: @axeminister

whatcha got cooking for Q3?

Well, I got my Q2 in very early, and I recon to do something similar for Q3. Maybe this won't be a common feeling, but it seems to me, having it in well early eliminates any kinda, whadayacall it? "twitching" later. By the time judging comes around, it's already been in the cue so long, I can just keep on forgetting about it. So... I should chose something now, hum?

Appears in these current issues:
No. 8 of Cossmass Infinities
Volume 4 of The Antihumanist (Page 9)
Commits random acts of journalism

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 18, 2022 8:40 am
Morgan
(@morgan-broadhead)
Silver Member
Posts: 282
Posted by: @angelslayah

Well, I got my Q2 in very early, and I recon to do something similar for Q3. Maybe this won't be a common feeling, but it seems to me, having it in well early eliminates any kinda, whadayacall it? "twitching" later. By the time judging comes around, it's already been in the cue so long, I can just keep on forgetting about it. So... I should chose something now, hum?

But nay, 'tis not so. The actual formula for twitchiness is:

# days submitted early
x pi
x r ^ (# current quarter)

The earlier you get your story in, the higher the twitching factor. Which is why I ALWAYS submit after 11PM the night of the deadline, or else just wait until the NEXT quarter, which is very likely what I'll end up doing this quarter.

"Writers WRITE. And they finish what they start."
- Chuck Wendig
Drop me a line at https://morganbroadhead.com
SFx1
HMx1
Rx4

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 18, 2022 9:29 am
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592
Posted by: @morgan-broadhead
Posted by: @angelslayah

Well, I got my Q2 in very early, and I recon to do something similar for Q3. Maybe this won't be a common feeling, but it seems to me, having it in well early eliminates any kinda, whadayacall it? "twitching" later. By the time judging comes around, it's already been in the cue so long, I can just keep on forgetting about it. So... I should chose something now, hum?

But nay, 'tis not so. The actual formula for twitchiness is:

# days submitted early
x pi
x r ^ (# current quarter)

The earlier you get your story in, the higher the twitching factor. Which is why I ALWAYS submit after 11PM the night of the deadline, or else just wait until the NEXT quarter, which is very likely what I'll end up doing this quarter.

Sir, I fear your formula is flawed. Take the following:

  • X = Number of days submitted early
  • Y = Number of days that have expired since the actual deadline
  • N = Number of days during which we do not expect judging to ever be complete (eg, 30)
  • B = Equal to Y-N, but never less than zero
  • σ = Personal Early-Entry Neurotic Quotient
  • Θ = "This is the One, this is the Best Story I Ever Wrote in my Entire Life" adjustment factor

Then, assigning µ as our Calculated Twitch Factor, we can derive approximately the following formula:

µ = (X × σ)² + (B + Θ)²

Thus, while the early-entry quotient initially results in high twitchiness for an entrant with a significant neurotic quotient, as the number of days begins to pass, the impact of early entry starts to be surpassed by the growing wait-time and the personal, individual belief in the fact that our immaculate story is surely almost guaranteed to nail it this time.

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 18, 2022 10:53 am
pdblake
(@pdblake)
Silver Member
Posts: 252

So going by the above my odds of winning are  50/50. Either I will or I won't.

Exactly the same as the lottery laughing  

R:6 HM:5 SHM:2
My Blog

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 18, 2022 11:51 am
Morgan
(@morgan-broadhead)
Silver Member
Posts: 282
Posted by: @doctorjest

Sir, I fear your formula is flawed. Take the following:

  • X = Number of days submitted early
  • Y = Number of days that have expired since the actual deadline
  • N = Number of days during which we do not expect judging to ever be complete (eg, 30)
  • B = Equal to Y-N, but never less than zero
  • σ = Personal Early-Entry Neurotic Quotient
  • Θ = "This is the One, this is the Best Story I Ever Wrote in my Entire Life" adjustment factor

Then, assigning µ as our Calculated Twitch Factor, we can derive approximately the following formula:

µ = (X × σ)² + (B + Θ)²

Thus, while the early-entry quotient initially results in high twitchiness for an entrant with a significant neurotic quotient, as the number of days begins to pass, the impact of early entry starts to be surpassed by the growing wait-time and the personal, individual belief in the fact that our immaculate story is surely almost guaranteed to nail it this time.

Dude! I laughed SO HARD at this!

"Writers WRITE. And they finish what they start."
- Chuck Wendig
Drop me a line at https://morganbroadhead.com
SFx1
HMx1
Rx4

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 18, 2022 12:53 pm
Martin L. Shoemaker
(@martin-l-shoemaker)
Platinum Member Moderator
Posts: 1909
Posted by: @angelslayah

Well, I got my Q2 in very early, and I recon to do something similar for Q3. Maybe this won't be a common feeling, but it seems to me, having it in well early eliminates any kinda, whadayacall it? "twitching" later. By the time judging comes around, it's already been in the cue so long, I can just keep on forgetting about it. So... I should chose something now, hum?

There is a significant strategic value to submitting early. When you're at risk of pro'ing out, early submission can keep you in the running. You don't pro out until the disqualifying story is published, not just accepted. Until that day, you can still enter; and that entry remains eligible for that quarter, even after you pro out. This isn't a hypothetical, it happened to me.

You might object that you're not at risk of pro'ing out; but to that I say, Not yet. I have confidence that you can be eventually. Keep submitting, and it can happen. So you might want to get the habit of submitting early.

http://nineandsixtyways.com/
Tools, Not Rules.
Martin L. Shoemaker
3rd Place Q1 V31
"Today I Am Paul", WSFA Small Press Award 2015, Nebula nomination 2015
Today I Am Carey from Baen
The Last Dance (#1 science fiction eBook on Amazon, October 2019) and The Last Campaign from 47North

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 18, 2022 9:06 pm
angelslayah
(@angelslayah)
Bronze Member
Posts: 81
Posted by: @martin-l-shoemaker
 

There is a significant strategic value to submitting early. When you're at risk of pro'ing out, early submission can keep you in the running.

This is the actual reason i sub early. I’m indeed poised to “pro out.” 

I don’t really “twitch” - rather i look with dismay on a contest which can’t even get out rejections every time, apparently, after keeping stories five or even seven months. 

It may be this jaundiced view which makes me think that “risk” is rather the wrong term, when confronting becoming a pro and leaving the contest behind. Rather than any contest, I urge others to focus on “career.”

 

Appears in these current issues:
No. 8 of Cossmass Infinities
Volume 4 of The Antihumanist (Page 9)
Commits random acts of journalism

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 3:05 am
storysinger
(@storysinger)
Gold Star Member
Posts: 1170

Now that I've learned to write short stories in one sitting, typing I am hesitant to sub early. Especially after seeing stories written and subbed at the deadline. That is where I'm at this quarter. happysigh Somehow, I have a story ready for submission, but with so much time remaining, the winning story could be trying to make itself known. What a dilemma. shrug  

Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality-D.R.Sweeney
HM-V32/Q3
HM-V36/Q4
HM-V38/Q1
HM-V38/Q4

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 9:34 am
angelslayah
(@angelslayah)
Bronze Member
Posts: 81
Posted by: @storysinger

Now that I've learned to write short stories in one sitting...

Uh huh. Howyoudothat?

Appears in these current issues:
No. 8 of Cossmass Infinities
Volume 4 of The Antihumanist (Page 9)
Commits random acts of journalism

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 10:28 am
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592
Posted by: @angelslayah

I don’t really “twitch” - rather i look with dismay on a contest which can’t even get out rejections every time, apparently, after keeping stories five or even seven months. 

In all fairness to the contest, this only ever happened in that last, most recent block, and was caused by the switch-over to a new submission management system that ran into some rather foul-sounding technical issues. With those ironed out, I would not expect this to be a thing going forwards, as it never was before that. The finale of each quarter, with all successes and failures being shared, has been a pretty regular event here on the forum.

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 11:54 am
storysinger, Ease, Yelena and 2 people liked
Wulf Moon
(@wulfmoon)
Platinum Plus Member Moderator
Posts: 2786
Posted by: @angelslayah
Posted by: @martin-l-shoemaker
 

There is a significant strategic value to submitting early. When you're at risk of pro'ing out, early submission can keep you in the running.

This is the actual reason i sub early. I’m indeed poised to “pro out.” 

I don’t really “twitch” - rather i look with dismay on a contest which can’t even get out rejections every time, apparently, after keeping stories five or even seven months. 

It may be this jaundiced view which makes me think that “risk” is rather the wrong term, when confronting becoming a pro and leaving the contest behind. Rather than any contest, I urge others to focus on “career.”

 

We all know the reasons for the recent added results delays, angelslayah. We’ve discussed this here before when you made similar comments. Wizehive did a program update that caused a glitch that forced thousands of anonymous numbered WotF entries in one quarter to be hand-matched to the entrants’ names and emails. And on this Q1’s judging, you know our dear coordinating judge David Farland died, a new judge had to be chosen, and all that work had to be handed over to her. Everyone that’s thinking of others understands what a tremendous blow this has been to the Contest. Author Services did act swiftly to obtain a new coordinating judge to run it, but the death of a major figure in any organization will cause an upset to operations for a time. Not that this has, to Author Services’ credit. Q1 results normally come out after the April workshop week and gala end. They have both a book launch and major Hollywood red carpet event to coordinate during this time, along with all the travel arrangements for their winners, judges, and special guests. We all know this and understand.

Entrants are treated respectfully, and they *are* informed of their results. Occasionally, one will slip through the cracks, but that’s because the Contest handles thousands of entries each quarter. I’ve had it happen when I was entering. It was a simple matter to write to Joni asking about my entry’s status, and she was quick to respond. Joni is *always* accessible and ready to help. I’ve entered many contests over the course of my career. I’ve only met one other coordinator as accessible and ready to help as Joni Labaqui. Most are next to impossible to reach. Joni cares.

I’m going to politely suggest once again that you cease speaking negatively about how this Contest operates to our members. If you’re unhappy with the pace of results, there are plenty of other contests you can enter. No one enjoys waiting for results, but there’s always been a good spirit here among Forumites about having to do so. They understand the challenges in running an international contest with thousands of entries each quarter, and understand that sometimes things happen beyond anyone’s control. 

Thank you.

Click here to JOIN THE WULF PACK!
"Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler" won Best SFF Story of 2019! Read it in WotF, Volume 35. Order HERE!
"Muzik Man" won Best SFF Story of 2020! Read it in Best of Deep Magic Anthology Two!
You know WotF Workshop's 24-hour story exercise? Want to see what I wrote? Just awarded Best All Other Short Stories of 2021! Read in THINGS WITH FEATHERS. Order HERE!
Enjoy my award-winning SUPER SECRETS of Writing articles! FREE to read in every issue of DreamForge Anvil! Don't miss Best Positive Future Story of 2021: "Shaken, Not Stirred." FREE! Click HERE!

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 12:31 pm
Martin L. Shoemaker
(@martin-l-shoemaker)
Platinum Member Moderator
Posts: 1909
Posted by: @angelslayah
Posted by: @storysinger

Now that I've learned to write short stories in one sitting...

Uh huh. Howyoudothat?

 

You'll get there. It takes different techniques for different people, but the essential technique is to get the story out without stopping to think. You can always revise it after, but get it out.

Easy, huh?

No, not easy, but it definitely gets easier with practice. When I wrote my 24-hour story at the workshop, it took me 24 hours to write 10,000 words. A lot of that was research and thinking to find a story in the prompts, including using my roommate as a sounding board (and acting as a sounding board for his). Some of it was sleeping. But when I started to see the story, the crucial element was to stay with it. It was a constrained, artificial scenario, with a deadline that short; but I did it. All or most winners do it every year.

Part of what makes it possible is we're encouraged to abandon any sense of perfection. At the end of the day, if the story doesn't work, throw it away! All you've invested was a day, and you were supposed to invest that day. It's part of the workshop you signed up for. So it's almost impossible for you to lose. The only losing is not writing.

And that's liberating. Because you're not worried, you can actually think about the story.

And thinking about the stories means some pretty good stories! Many 24-hour stories have been published. Mine was selected as a finalist in the Year's Best Science Fiction and Adventure Stories volume 4.

After that, it's back to practice. I wish I had tracked my progress more carefully, so I could give you an idea of how long one writer took to get to that point.

can tell you that one year after the workshop, I sat down and dictated "Today I Am Paul" in a single session, a one-hour drive to work. That story has taken off like I never imagined, so it worked. But at the time, I still wasn't at a point where I could tell a story in one sitting consistently. It happened when it happened.

And over time, it happened more regularly. Today--seven years later--it's pretty reliable for me: when I sit down in my Jeep or climb up on my treadmill, I'm going to dictate somewhere between 2,500 and 4,000 words per hour. 6,000 on a great day.

Part of what makes that possible for me is dictation--another habit that took time to build. When I started, it was awkward and difficult. (Yet that first dictated story appeared in two year's best collections, so there was something there.) Now it's effortless. Last week I spoke at an online writer group; and afterward I participated in their writing sprints. I typed the first two sprints, because I didn't want my dictation to annoy them. Then somebody pointed out the obvious, that I could mute myself (Duh!), so I dictated the final sprint. The results showed why dictation works so well for me. The story was my current novel, something I'm very deep in mentally, so I was telling story with essentially no blocks. Best speed forward. Typing, I averaged 25 words per minute. Dictating: 64 words per minute. 2.5 times faster. That means I get 2.5 times as many words out in a given time period. 2.5 times more story before I stop and maybe lose the thread.

If dictation doesn't work for you, you can still get faster with practice. Give yourself permission to write junk--even if you throw it out--as long as you write a lot, and as steadily as possible. I'll bet you'll get faster in relatively short time. And I'm betting it won't be junk.

http://nineandsixtyways.com/
Tools, Not Rules.
Martin L. Shoemaker
3rd Place Q1 V31
"Today I Am Paul", WSFA Small Press Award 2015, Nebula nomination 2015
Today I Am Carey from Baen
The Last Dance (#1 science fiction eBook on Amazon, October 2019) and The Last Campaign from 47North

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 12:45 pm
catherine, David Hankins, angelslayah and 5 people liked
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592
Posted by: @martin-l-shoemaker

And that's liberating. Because you're not worried, you can actually think about the story.

And thinking about the stories means some pretty good stories! Many 24-hour stories have been published. Mine was selected as a finalist in the Year's Best Science Fiction and Adventure Stories volume 4.

This is intriguing to me. When I look back at my writing, and the stories I've written, I'd say that I still feel often that I'm at a point where I frequently write pretty well--but the stories I'm writing are too often just so-so. More specifically, I have had a tendency to take an idea, and then select the wrong entry-point to exploring that idea, without really questioning that until I'm already well into the process of writing it. I get locked into trying to make this specific version of the idea work exactly how I want, when it's sometimes not the version of the idea I should be writing.

I think this has improved for me recently--a product mostly of me forcing myself to look at my work's weakest points, and still too recent for me to have a lot of confidence in how much it has improved--but it's still where I believe I most need to improve. I'm stumbling around this, but trying. Of the stories I finished in the last few months, fully three-quarters are either complete rewrites of stories, or are shelved because they need such a rewrite. The same ideas, but with either new entry-points or some fundamental change in how the subject is being handled.

But I think the resulting stories either have been better, or will be better, as a result of this--and I think that what I'm learning by doing this may help me to get to a point where, in the future, I start the stories at this point, with the right ideas and the right frame.

I'm actually doing exactly this right now, though, with the novel project I kicked off. Writing scenes, sections, exploring characters, and all with zero expectation that anything I'm writing will need to be retained. And it is certainly liberating. I've still not done this often with my short stories--but I would like to note that the last story I wrote, truly expecting that it might end up being nothing more than throw-away nonsense that I would do nothing with, made Finalist here. So while it's purely anecdotal, it does feel like there's more than a hint of something to all of this.

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 1:26 pm
David Hankins, Disgruntled Peony, Ease and 1 people liked
RETreasure
(@rschibler)
Gold Member
Posts: 872
Posted by: @martin-l-shoemaker

 

After that, it's back to practice. I wish I had tracked my progress more carefully, so I could give you an idea of how long one writer took to get to that point.

 

I did keep track, so I can tell you.

My first year of writing (2017) I wrote 4 stories. One for each contest quarter. (and 2 books, because words is words, and practice is practice!)

My second year of writing, I wrote 5 stories. One for each quarter, and a bonus! Progress! (and a book and a half)

My third year, I wrote 5 stories. (and a book) But this year was a bad year for me personally, so holding the status quo was progress in a way. I also sold my first story. (and wrote a book!)

And then, a lot of the study and practice I'd done came together.

My fourth year, I wrote 14 stories. I wrote a story in a day during this year, and the quality was much more consistent.

Last year, I wrote 13 stories and a book, and while I'm not 100% consistent at quality yet, I can say that the quality is a lot better than it used to be, and I get better with every story and book.

Keep writing, don't give up! Grit will out!

 

V34: R,HM,R
V35: HM,R,R,HM
V36: R,HM,HM,SHM
V37: HM,SF,SHM,SHM
V38: (P)F, SHM, F, F
V39: SHM, P, P
Always Available for 5-page Critiques
www.rebeccaetreasure.com

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 5:09 pm
storysinger
(@storysinger)
Gold Star Member
Posts: 1170
Posted by: @martin-l-shoemaker

You'll get there. It takes different techniques for different people, but the essential technique is to get the story out without stopping to think.

I think that's a good description Martin. Once I enter the story I follow it to the conclusion, unless the story is bigger than one sitting.

In the interest of staying healthy I get up and walk around the house frequently, going over possible story arcs.

I've done the opposite of you. I ditched the digital typing for qwerty because my cheap version of the dragon typed words I never said.

In the future I will definitely upgrade to the pro version of dragon so I can maximize my word count. Write on! 

Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality-D.R.Sweeney
HM-V32/Q3
HM-V36/Q4
HM-V38/Q1
HM-V38/Q4

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 5:28 pm
Martin L. Shoemaker
(@martin-l-shoemaker)
Platinum Member Moderator
Posts: 1909
Posted by: @doctorjest

I'm actually doing exactly this right now, though, with the novel project I kicked off. Writing scenes, sections, exploring characters, and all with zero expectation that anything I'm writing will need to be retained. And it is certainly liberating. I've still not done this often with my short stories--but I would like to note that the last story I wrote, truly expecting that it might end up being nothing more than throw-away nonsense that I would do nothing with, made Finalist here. So while it's purely anecdotal, it does feel like there's more than a hint of something to all of this.

And the other liberating factor, much like our 24-hour stories, is it's a time-boxed experiment. If it doesn't work, you've lost only one session. Throw it away (or file it away), and try again tomorrow.

http://nineandsixtyways.com/
Tools, Not Rules.
Martin L. Shoemaker
3rd Place Q1 V31
"Today I Am Paul", WSFA Small Press Award 2015, Nebula nomination 2015
Today I Am Carey from Baen
The Last Dance (#1 science fiction eBook on Amazon, October 2019) and The Last Campaign from 47North

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 6:15 pm
Martin L. Shoemaker
(@martin-l-shoemaker)
Platinum Member Moderator
Posts: 1909
Posted by: @storysinger

In the future I will definitely upgrade to the pro version of dragon so I can maximize my word count. Write on! 

Four factors can make a big difference in accuracy:

  1. Machine power (though this affects speed more than accuracy).
  2. Noise environment. In this quiet room here, my accuracy will be 100%, save for homonyms. If I dictate in my Jeep while traveling down a highway at 70 m.p.h. in a windstorm, my accuracy will be about 10%. Unusable.
  3. Microphone quality. In that same Jeep at that same speed in that same windstorm but using my high-end cardioid microphone, my accuracy will be a few wrong words per page. I spend more time correcting my own mistakes than Dragon's.
  4. Practice. I learned to speak more directly at the microphone.

It's not for everybody, but it's a game changer for me.

http://nineandsixtyways.com/
Tools, Not Rules.
Martin L. Shoemaker
3rd Place Q1 V31
"Today I Am Paul", WSFA Small Press Award 2015, Nebula nomination 2015
Today I Am Carey from Baen
The Last Dance (#1 science fiction eBook on Amazon, October 2019) and The Last Campaign from 47North

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 19, 2022 6:21 pm
DoctorJest
(@doctorjest)
Silver Star Member
Posts: 592

 I did try out dictation earlier this year, but then forgot all about it when some busy things happened in my life, and when I returned to writing again, I had clean forgotten all about it. This all just makes me want to return and give it another try, to see what happens. 

DQ: 0 / R: 0 / RWC: 0 / HM: 10 / SHM: 5 / SF: 0 / F: 1
Entered for Q2.V39 and Q3.V39
Last result: SHM for Q1.V39
Revised SHM ('Ashwright') at PodCastle

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 20, 2022 10:24 am
Page 1 / 6
Share: