Writers and Illustrators of the Future announce new website

Writers and Illustrators of the Future announce new website

Hollywood, CA – Author Services announced today that a new website has just gone live and celebrates the first 29 years of the Contests.  Accessible either from www.writersofthefuture.com or www.illustratorsofthefuture.com, the new site has several new features.

A special feature is the description of each of the 29 annual awards events with the specifics of when and where they took place, plus the list of stories and winners and winning artists and a photo gallery from that year’s ceremony.  Many of these photos have not been seen since first taken nearly three decades ago, including A.E. Van Vogt, Ray Bradbury, Roger Zelazny, Forrest Ackerman, and many more.

The full list of writer and illustrator judges, past and present, has been made available with links to a photo and bio for each as well as their website where these exist.

Past writer winners and illustrator winners have likewise been listed, and where we have current information, their name has been converted into a hot link to a bio, photo and any website they have.  An especially nice feature for artist winners is to additionally showcase their art.

The existing blog, Facebook and Twitter feeds are easily navigated from the site’s home page.

“While we have made the site go live, we realize that it is a work in progress requiring past winners, or their friends, to provide missing data so we can continue making it as complete as possible,” stated Joni Labaqui, the Contest Director, in making the announcement about the new site.

The Writers of the Future writing contest (www.writersofthefuture.com) was initiated by L. Ron Hubbard in 1983 to provide a means for aspiring writers to get that much-needed break. Due to the success of the Writing Contest, the companion Illustrators of the Future Contest was created in 1988 (www.illustratorsofthefuture.com).

The intensive mentoring process has proven very successful. The 348 past winners of the Writing Contest have published 838 novels and nearly 4,000 short stories. They have produced 27 New York Times bestsellers and their works have sold over 50 million copies.

The 276 past winners of the Illustrating Contest have produced over 4,500 illustrations, 356 comic books, graced 594 books and albums with their art and visually contributed to 36 TV shows and 46 major movies.

Dave Wolverton trained 4 New York Times bestselling authors

Dave Wolverton aka David Farland coordinating judge in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Contest continues to pay it forward

Contest winner from 28 years ago has trained 4 New York Times bestselling authors

HOLLYWOOD  –  The Writers of the Future Contest was initiated nearly thirty years ago by L. Ron Hubbard to help discover new talent in the field of science fiction and fantasy.  Over the decades, hundreds of winners have gone on to critical acclaim, twelve winners having become New York Times bestselling authors. And over the years, Dave Wolverton has taught dozens of new authors in the contest workshop and in his own workshops, who afterward went on to success, including such #1 New York Times Bestsellers as Brandon Sanderson (Wheel of Time), Brandon Mull (Fablehaven), Stephenie Meyer (Twilight) and James Dashner (The Mazer Runner).

In 1987, Dave Wolverton was one of the early Writers of the Future Contest winners. winning the Gold Award for Best Short Story of the Year.  And as such, he was mentored by then Contest coordinating judge Algis Budrys, using Hubbard’s essays on writing (an essential ingredient of the now-famous Writers of the Future workshop).  Immediately following his win, he signed a three-novel contract with Bantam Books.  To date he has penned dozens of novels as Dave Wolverton in the science fiction genre, and as David Farland in fantasy.

Throughout his career he has won numerous awards, including the Philip K. Dick Memorial Special Award for “Best Novel in the English Language,” the Whitney Award for “Best Novel of the Year,” and the International Book Award for “Best Young Adult Novel of the Year.”  He has hit the New York Times Bestseller list numerous times, and in 1999 set the Guinness Record for the world’s largest single-author, single-book signing.

As Coordinating Judge for the Writers of the Future Contest, Wolverton pays it forward as he reads Contest entries and selects the finalists, semi-finalists and Honorable Mentions. In addition he edits the annual L. Ron Hubbard Presents the Writers and Illustrators of the Future anthology and instructs the winning authors at the annual winners workshop every year with co-judge Tim Powers (On Stranger Tides).

To learn more, including details on how to enter the contests, visit the website at www.writersofthefuture.com

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David Farland’s Daily Kick in the Pants

—Ten Reasons Why I’ll Quickly Reject Your Story

Here are ten reasons why I reject stories quickly—usually within the first page.

Jim Wolverton

6/19/2012

This past week I finished judging the first quarter of Writers of the Future, and now I’m working on the second quarter. Most of the stories come to us electronically, so much of my day is spent opening files, taking a look at them, and then putting in a review—usually one that says “Rejected.”

I hate that “Reject” button, and I may ask our programmers to give it a title that is a little less offensive, something like, “I’m afraid that this doesn’t meet our needs at the current time.”

Seriously, though, I sometimes wish that I could explain to a young writer why I’m passing on a story. So I’m going to talk about it here.

Here are ten reasons why I reject stories quickly—usually within the first page:

1) The story is unintelligible. Very often I’ll get submissions that just don’t make sense. Often, these seem to be non-English speakers who are way off in both the meaning of words, their context, or in their syntax, but more often it’s just clumsiness. I’ve seen college presidents who couldn’t write. But this lack of care is on a gradient scale, from “I can’t figure out what this is about” to “I don’t want to bother trying to figure this out” to “there are minor problems in this story.” For example, yesterday a promising story called a dungeon the “tombs.” Was it a mistake, or a metaphor? I don’t think it was a metaphor. The author had made too many other errors where the “almost correct” word was used.

2) The story is unbelievable. “Johnny Verve was the smartest kid on earth, and he was only six. He was strongest one, and the most handsome, too. But the coolest part was when he found out he had magical powers!” At that point, I’m gone, and not just because there were four uses of “was” in three sentences.

3) The author leaves no noun or verb unmodified. Sometimes when an author is struggling to start a story, he try to infuse too much information into a sentence: “John rubbed his chapped, dry, sand-covered hands together grimly, and gazed thirstily over the harsh, red, crusty deserts of a deserted Mars.” I may put up with one sentence like that in an otherwise well-written story. You put two of those sentences together on the first page, and it really bogs a story down. Unfortunately, if you’re in a modifying mood, you might just start looking for reasons to add unnecessary adjectives and adverbs, and that will kill your pacing. People who do this on the first page of a manuscript will do it throughout. Very often these modifications turn into “purple prose.”

4) Nothing’s happening. This morning I read one where a girl, Marcy, gets out of bed, puts on her clothes (after carefully selecting each item), eats breakfast, and goes to the school bus. It was written well enough, but at the end of a couple of pages I start wondering when the story is going to begin. It really didn’t matter. It hadn’t begun yet, and the author had wasted too much space. I call these the “Never Beginning” stories. Often the inciting incident does occur, but I literally see stories that go on like this for 20 pages, as if the author is merely chronicling a day in the life of their protagonist. It really doesn’t matter if something happens or not. If nothing significant occurs in two pages and I don’t have any reason to go further, I have to reject the story.

5) A major element is left out. An “element” of your story includes your character, setting, conflict, theme, and treatment. Yesterday I read a promising story about a young woman who sings magical crystals out of the ground. The author had good penetration, good voice and inner conflicts. Unfortunately, after five pages I still didn’t know where the story was set. Originally I thought the protagonist was mining in a cave, but then found that she glanced up at the sun. Were there trees in the story, mountains, clouds? I’m not sure. The author never mentioned them. Very often, I think that new authors neglect to put in elements like a setting just because they’re unsure how to weave that information in. But that kind of information needs to be there. Here’s a hint—if you don’t tell me your protagonist’s name in the first two paragraphs, I’ll probably reject the story. Why? Because long experience has taught me that if you make that mistake, you’ll probably leave out other vital information, too.

6) The author is unable to “imply” information. Consider the following sentences. Which one do you think the author should use to convey the intended information?

1) She shook.
2) She shook his hand.
3) She reached out and shook his hand.
4) She reached out her hand and shook his hand.
5) She reached out her hand and shook his hand with her hand that she was reaching out with.

You’d be surprised by what people write. Yesterday I had a woman who “shook,” and it wasn’t obvious that she was shaking someone’s hand until three sentences later. That’s a case where the author thought that his sentence implied more than it did. A few stories later, I got option number five, which was vastly over-written. Here’s a tip: since we typically have to reach out to shake someone’s hand, the words “reached out” in each of the above sentences are already implied, and probably are unnecessary. In the same way, when we stand, we don’t need to add the word “up.” If we sit, we don’t need to add the word “down.” If someone “nods,” we don’t have to add the words “his head.” No one ever nods his knee. Authors who are unaware of how to imply information will almost always overwrite their stories, adding entire scenes that don’t need to be there. Either that, or they’ll leave out a great deal of vital description. Rarely will they do both.

7) There simply isn’t a story. You would be surprised at how many pieces come in that are philosophical diatribes, or letters, or reminiscences. Those are rejected instantly.

8) Oily tales. Some authors think that readers like to be shocked, so they struggle to be as bloody, violent, disgusting, or perverse as possible. One must remember that if you’re submitting to a major contest, the winning stories will be published. Any story that you submit that is not fit to be read by a high school student is, in my opinion, fatally flawed and will be rejected. Profanity may be edited out, but if vile content is what the story is about, then you need to be submitting to someone else.

9) Non-formed stories. A lot of people are submitting flash fiction, a few paragraphs that might be interesting but which usually don’t have much to offer. I can imagine a rare circumstance where a flash fiction piece might win, but when placed beside a long, formed story, flash pieces almost always suffer by comparison because the conflicts in the piece never get properly developed and resolved. The same is true with japes (stories that start as stories and end as jokes).

10) The tale is out of chronological order on the micro-level. Some authors love this construction: “John raced out the door, after brushing his teeth.” So I as the reader am forced to imagine John rushing out the door, then back up and imagine the tooth-bushing scene. If I see two of these in a short story, I’ll forgive them. But if I get two on the first page of a story, I’ll show no mercy. The reason is simple: the author almost always makes a lot of other errors, too, which will show up as unneeded flashbacks and as unnecessary point-of-view shifts.

But what if you’re not the kind of author who makes simple, careless mistakes? What if you’re conscientious, hard-working, and have a decent idea for what it takes to tell a story? I’ll go over some other problems tomorrow—the kinds of things that might not get your story rejected, but won’t let it climb above “Honorable Mention.”

WOTF Rookie Release Update

CLEAR THE BOOK SHELF AND MAKE ROOM FOR THE ROOKIE

Writers and Illustrators of the Future Winners are Tomorrow’s

Dan Brown and Stephen King

HOLLYWOOD, CA- More than 600 rookie writers and illustrators have been given their chance to have successful professional careers as winners of the L. Ron Hubbard Writers and Illustrators of the Future Contests over the past 29 years.  With combined cash prizes totaling over $750,000, over one-thousand bookstore signings and scrapbooks full of media generated, these rookies-turned-pro writers have gone on to publish over 300 novels and 3,000 short stories, with several becoming New York Times best-selling authors, including Stephen Baxter, Jo Beverly, Leonard Carpenter, Nancy Farmer, Karen Joy Fowler, Robert Reed, Dean Wesley Smith, Sean Williams, Dave Wolverton and David Zindell.

“With only 3 in 10,000 stories written in the US ever getting published, so many creative writers have seen their dreams crushed.  So to see a means for the newcomer to have a chance to break in is a very rewarding endeavor,” says Joni Labaqui, the Contests’ director.  Writers of the Future, now in its 30th year, was created by best-selling author L. Ron Hubbard with the purpose to discover and encourage talented beginning writers of science fiction and fantasy.

“The Writers of the Future Contest provides that break that new writers and illustrators need and deserve,” Labaqui said. “This tradition continues with the latest group of just announced winners for our 30th installment.”  The latest list of Writers and Illustrators of the Future winners can be seen below.

The 22nd Writers of the Future  anthology (Galaxy Press, 2006) features the works of the 12 winning quarterly writers and 12 illustrators from the 2005-2006 Contest. With its availability in so many diverse outlets such as airports, Walmart as well as bookstores, the Anthology has been consistently on science fiction and anthology bestseller lists throughout December and January.

CONTEST WINNERS

FIRST QUARTER

WRITERS OF THE FUTURE
First place: Jeff Carlson of Walnut Creek, CA, USA
Second place: Tony Pi of Toronto, ON, CAN
Third place: Corey Brown of North Palm Beach, FL, USA

ILLUSTRATORS OF THE FUTURE
Bryan Beus of Provo, UT, USA
Bogdan Stetsenko of Kiev, Ukraine
Lars Edwards of Arlington, MA, USA

SECOND QUARTER

WRITERS OF THE FUTURE
First place: Kim Zimring of Decatur, GA, USA
Second place: Douglas Texter of Minneapolis, MN, USA
Third place: Damon Kaswell of Eugene, OR, USA

ILLUSTRATORS OF THE FUTURE
Artem Mirolevich of Brooklyn, NY, USA
Corey Loving of Country Club Hills, IL, USA
Amelia Mammoliti of El Dorado Hills, CA, USA

THIRD QUARTER

WRITERS OF THE FUTURE
First place: Stephen Kotowych of Toronto, ON, CAN
Second place: Aliette de Bodard of Paris, France
Third place: Karl Bunker of Jamaica Plain, MA, USA

ILLUSTRATORS OF THE FUTURE
Randall Ensley of Gales Ferry, CT, USA
Marcus Collins of Pasadena, CA, USA
Peter Town of Sacramento, CA, USA

 

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WOTF Celebrating Three Decades of New Talent in Science Fiction and Fantasy

Writers of the Future Sets Date for Event Celebrating Three Decades of Honoring the Hottest New Talent in Science Fiction and Fantasy

Hollywood, CA – Author Services, Inc. has announced that Writers of the Future volume 30 will be released in Los Angeles at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre on Sunday, April 13, 2014. “We wanted to get this announcement made early enough for fans to make their plans for this very special anniversary event,” stated Joni Labaqui, the Contests’ Director.

2014 marks the 30th anniversary for the Writers Contest as well as the very special 25th anniversary for the Illustrators Contest.  Known for being one of science fiction‘s premier annual events, the awards ceremony brings the best of science fiction and fantasy’s professional world together with the genre’s hottest new talent.

Science fiction and fantasy fans will see contest judges presenting awards to the contest winners, judges whose works they have admired since becoming readers of the genre.  Such professionals include Kevin J. Anderson (Dune novels), Orson Scott Card (Ender’s Game), Tim Powers (On Stranger Tides), 5-time Hugo winner Mike Resnick and Grand Master of Science Fiction Robert Silverberg.  Also attending are top art professionals, including Dave Dorman (art of Star Wars), Larry Elmore (cover art for Dungeons & Dragons), Cliff Nielsen (Narnia book cover art) and Stephen Hickman, with over 350 book covers to his credit.

Over the first 30 years, the Writers and Illustrators of the Future have recognized over 700 winners and have an astonishing record of winners who have gone on to achieve significant careers in the arts following their Contest win.

Acknowledged as the premiere writing contest of its kind, the Writers of the Future Contest was created in 1983 by best-selling author L. Ron Hubbard as a means for aspiring writers to have their work seen and acknowledged. The success of the original writer’s competition gave rise to the companion Illustrators of the Future Contest. As it has always been, there are no entry fees for the contests.

In addition to substantial cash awards, the contest winners and selected finalists are showcased in an annual anthology published by Galaxy Press, and are flown out to participate in an expenses-paid week-long workshop led by professional published writers and illustrators.

For more information about the contests, the judges and past winners, go to www.writersofthefuture.com
or to www.Facebook/WritersAndIllustratorsOfTheFuture

Writer Ron Ginzler provides 25 insightful science fiction and fantasy stories

Writers of the Future Winner from 1994 releases his short story collection “The Iron Apples of the Stars”

Writer Ron Ginzler provides 25 insightful science fiction and fantasy stories

HOLLYWOOD, CA – Ron Ginzler of Battle Creek, Michigan, 1994 winner of the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest, announced the release of his new science fiction and fantasy collection, “The Iron Apples of the Stars.”

The collection includes eclectic story lines such as, a future where chimpanzees work in factories and go to nature preserves to see humans in their natural habitat, a woman who puts out fires by walking into burning buildings, a high school where no one can remember what happened yesterday, or any other day before that. “The Iron Apples of the Stars” is a collection of short stories that take you down intriguingly twisty paths, all leading to oddly inevitable conclusions.

Ron started his career by entering and winning in the international contest known for launching careers in speculative fiction, with the short story “Winter’s Cycle,” appearing in the L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future volume 10 (Bridge Publications), in 1995.

He then went on to publish short stories “Swamp Logic” and “Whistle-stop” in Tomorrow sf magazine and “The Baobab Tree” through the 90’s and also penned non-fiction articles that have appeared throughout his writing career.

For more information on the Writers of the Future contest, go to www.writersofthefuture.com.

For more information about Ron’s book visit amazon.com

Brian Trent publishes “The Nightmare Lights of Mars” to the delight of Escape Pod’s editor

Connecticut writer, screenwriter and philosopher and Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future contest winner this year continues publishing online Brian Trent publishes “The Nightmare Lights of Mars” to the delight of Escape Pod’s editor

HOLLYWOOD, CA — Brian Trent of Prospect, Connecticut had his second short story published this  year since his win and publication in the bestselling Science Fiction anthology series — L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume 29 this past April. His short story, “The Nightmare Lights of Mars” was sold to and published at Escape Pod, skillfully narrated by voiceover artist Veronica Giguere. With this story now available Brian announced, “the hosts informed me that it is one his favorite stories of the year, and this is a weekly publication.” Escape Pod is the premiere science fiction podcast magazine. Every week they publish short stories in a convenient audio format for your computer or MP3 player. The stories are free and they are supported through listener donations and sponsorship.

Brian was honored at the 29th Annual L. Ron Hubbard Achievement awards this past April, 2013 at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles. Brian’s winning story, “War Hero” published in the bestselling anthology.  In August Brian was featured in the online publication Daily Science Fiction with his story, “Sparg.”

Brian is a philosopher, writer and in addition to his love of and science fiction short story publication history, is also a screen writer with a current project in post production, “Selene Hollow,” a successful Kickstarter project that reached its funding goal and has just completed and released its trailer.

The Contests were initiated by L. Ron Hubbard in 1983 shortly after returning to the field of science fiction with his bestseller Battlefield Earth. And to date the contest has launched the careers of 12 New York Times bestselling authors.

For more information on Brian Trent please visit, BrianTrent.com

For more information on the contest, go to www.writersofthefuture.com.

Top Writing Contest and Illustrating Contest Announces 30 September Deadline

L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers and Illustrators of the Future: Top Writing Contest and Illustrating Contest Announces 30 September Deadline

Last Call to Enter Writing Contest and Illustrating Contest

Hollywood, CA – With less than two weeks remaining to close out the first 30 years in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future writing contest for science fiction and fantasy, and the first 25 years for its companion Illustrators of the Future illustrating contest, the Contest Administration is urging writers and artists to submit their entries by midnight September 30. Aspiring writers and artists alike are able to submit their stories and art online for no entry fee by going to www.writersofthefuture.com.

Writers of the Future Contest winner and now NYT bestselling author Patrick Rothfuss wrote when finally seeing his work published (The Name of the Wind), “It’s fair to say that without Writers of the Future, I wouldn’t be where I am today….”

Contest judge Orson Scott Card (Enders Game) wrote, “If you’ve got a good story and you have not yet been published, the first thing you do is submit it to the Writers of the Future Contest. I tell everybody that it’s the only literary contest I’ve seen that is worth entering.”

Master illustrator Frank Frazetta who was also one of the original Contest judges claimed, “The Illustrators of the Future Contest is one of the best opportunities a young artist will ever get. You have nothing to lose and a lot to win.”

While Contest winner, Contest judge and Academy Award winner Shaun Tan noted, “Illustrators of the Future offered a channel through which to direct my ambitions.  The competition made me realize that genre illustration is actually a valued profession, and here was a rare opportunity for a possibly entry point into that world.”

Whether an aspiring writer or artist, you should take the time to submit your best work by going to www.writersofthefuture.com and clicking on Contest Entry on the upper right side of the page.

Acknowledged as the premiere writing contest of its kind, the Writers of the Future Contest was created in 1983 by best-selling author L. Ron Hubbard as a means for aspiring writers to have their work seen and acknowledged. The success of the original writer’s competition gave rise to the companion Illustrators of the Future Contest. As it has always been, there are no entry fees for the contests.

In addition to substantial cash awards, the contest winners and selected finalists are showcased in an annual anthology published by Galaxy Press, and are flown out to participate in an expenses-paid week-long workshop led by professional published writers and illustrators.

For more information about the contests, the judges and past winners, go to www.writersofthefuture.com.

Writers of the Future: A Literary Olympics

A contest created in 1983 by L. Ron Hubbard is today’s most effective means for aspiring writers to break into the publishing world

Hollywood, CA—Before 1983, the odds were stacked heavily against new writers. An aspiring author had to go up against seasoned professionals who had awards, bestsellers and fan followings. Even if a newcomer’s story was superior to that of an established writer, due to marketing considerations a publisher usually chose the familiar name over the unknown. Aspiring authors had an uphill battle with no one to lend them a helping hand.

Even though he became one of the most popular and prolific authors of the twentieth century, L. Ron Hubbard never forgot how tough it can be for the newcomer. Throughout his literary career Hubbard frequently encouraged aspiring writers by offering his advice, serving in writers’ organizations and writing instructional articles.

Thus it was in 1983 that Hubbard endowed and established the Writers of the Future Contest—which leveled the playing field for new writers.

International bestselling author and Writers of the Future Contest judge, Kevin J. Anderson (Dune prequels) stated, “This ambitious and ground-breaking Contest is the equivalent of a ‘literary Olympics’ for aspiring authors eager for that one chance to get their foot in the door.”  There is no entry fee, and the Contest is not open to established pros—only to new writers.

Anderson further noted, “The Writers of the Future Contest offers significant prize money, and a blue-ribbon panel of judges whose names have formed the very core of the science fiction and fantasy genres.” Each year, the winners receive their trophies at a grand awards celebration in incredible venues in places such as Hollywood, the United Nations in New York and Las Vegas.

After several years of enormous success, the Writers of the Future Contest was joined by a sister competition: Illustrators of the Future.  It has likewise served as a beacon to guide new artists.

And the world has paid attention. Winners have gone on to sign book contracts, sell stories to major magazines and appear on awards ballots. Now, for almost three decades, Writers and Illustrators of the Future have discovered and nurtured the new stars of science fiction and fantasy.

For more information go to www.writersofthefuture.com

 

3rd Quarter Winners announced in international IOTF contest

3RD QUARTER WINNERS ANNOUNCED IN INTERNATIONAL

ILLUSTRATORS OF THE FUTURE CONTEST

Winners this quarter are from the upper border of the US and from Canada

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

HOLLYWOOD –  The 3rd  Quarter winners of the 28th year of the L. Ron Hubbard Illustrators of the Future Contest were announced today by Joni Labaqui, the contest Director.
The winners are from Canada, Massachusetts and Wisconsin.

THIRD QUARTER WINNERS                              

Fiona Meng of Ontario, Canada                   
John Haverty of Massachusetts                                                
Pat Steiner of Wisconsin           

They were chosen from a group of 9 finalists and are awarded a week long intensive workshop, an awards ceremony and are also published in the annual L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future. Fiona, John and Pat will also receive a cash prize for their win this quarter.

A Grand Prize winner is announced at the annual awards ceremony and is selected by another panel of judges. They will all now compete with the other winners from the other quarters, twelve in all, for the grand prize of $5,000.

Well-known contest judges include award winning artists Cliff Nielsen, Bob Eggleton, Stephen Hickman, Laura Brodian Freas, Judith Miller, Vincent DiFate, Leo & Diane Dillon, Stephen Youll and Stephan Martiniere.

“The judges do not know who they are choosing, the names are concealed from them for a fair judging process. Artists like this because they know it is based on talent alone,” the contest director said.

For more information about the contest, go to www.writersofthefuture.com

3rd Quarter Finalists Announced in International Contest for Illustrators

3rd Quarter Finalists Announced in International Contest for Illustrators

All Corners of the US and Canada are Represented in this Latest Finalist Round

HOLLYWOOD  Finalists for the 3rd Quarter of the 22nd year of the L. Ron Hubbard Illustrators of the Future Contest were announced today by Joni Labaqui, the contest Director.

The finalists for this quarter are from Canada, and all four corners of the United States.

THIRD QUARTER FINALISTS

  • Alejandro Bibriesca of California   
  • Krista Campbell of New Jersey                        
  • Stephanie Campbell of Michigan     
  • Jamie Hansen of Arizona      
  • John Haverty of Massachusetts  
  • Paulina Klaser of Texas      
  • Fiona Meng of Ontario, Canada
  • Pat Steiner of Wisconsin
  • Emalie Tison of Wisconin                                    

The 9 finalists’ art is sent to four of the contest judges. Of the nine finalists, three will be winners of the quarter. The three winners of each quarter are awarded cash prizes, a week long intensive workshop, an awards ceremony and are also published in the annual L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future. Writers have their own contest and our winning illustrators illustrate the winning writers’ stories.  The judging process, once the finalists are determined by the coordinating judge, takes a little over a month.

A Grand Prize winner is announced at the annual awards ceremony and is selected from another panel of judges and receives an additional $5,000.

“The Illustrators of the Future Contest is an effective means for aspiring illustrators to make their break in an industry well-known for being hard to break into for the newcomer,” Labaqui said.

More than 500 talented writers and illustrators have been given their opportunity to lead successful professional careers as winners of the L. Ron Hubbard Writers and Illustrators of the Future Contests over the past 25 years.  And these rookies-turned-pro writers have gone on to publish over 500 novels and 3,000 short stories—accounting for some 31 million books sold—with several winners becoming New York Times best-selling authors.

For more information about the contest, go to www.writersofthefuture.com. Or call the contest at 323-466-3310.

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